Jump to content

Recommended Posts

36 minutes ago, MGershone said:

 

Spoiler

sticker.jpg

 

It's not Korean.  Portions of the characters seem similar to Hangul (Korean) and Hiragana (Japanese), so it is probably the Torio language (similar to how they devised the Rosharan Scripts) - and likely derived with influence from Hanze/Hanja/Kanji, Hangul and Hiragana

Edited by Treamayne
Links
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Treamayne, that is definitely not Hangul. Just looks like a in-world script influenced from a mix of Korean and Japanese scripts (just like how Torio and Nagadan are based on a mix of Korea and Japan)

Also, yeah, how did you get it already? While I am not calling you a liar, I want to believe you, this does feel a little suspicious. 

Edited by Firesong
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, Here's my best guesses:

Relevant Section:

Spoiler

Sticker_1.thumb.jpg.57b45dbaa31e057189eb539b5bfc4bc5.jpg

This could be either Character-Based (like Chinese, Hanja, Kanji) or Syllable Based (like Hangul, Hiragana)

Character:

Spoiler

Sticker_Char.thumb.jpg.bbb1f35d5941d0f1e4f85311d883f7d4.jpg

If it is character based, it is probably these two characters.

Syllable:

Spoiler

Sticker_Syl.thumb.jpg.bf96c6ea5a8361c9f530196ae5e50cc8.jpg

If it is syllabic, then it is probably two two-syllable words, broken like this.

Analysis:

Spoiler

Sticker_Num.thumb.jpg.b71f731b6d94170bfecad69b36f01240.jpg

  1. Stroke Order makes this look like a Korean "n" (ㄴ) at top, followed by a possible Japanese "hi" twice (ひ) - that's assuming the vertical line is either based on the Korean vowel i "ㅣ" - or - the possible "니" (overlapping) could just be based on the Japanese a kana " あ " with the "no"(の) portion replaced by "hi"
  2. This is the one that loks closest to Chinese, to me. An argument could be made for it to derived of some combination of Hangul letters u, d/t, g/k (ㅜ,ㄷ/ㅌ,ㄱ/ㅋ). Maybe some derivation of Japanese "se" (せ).
  3. Depending on if the "cross tail" from Syllable 1 is part of this one, it could be some combination of Korean "g/k" (ㄱ) with Japanese "sa" (reversed - さ ).
  4. The "riyul" (r/l - ㄹ) is the most clearly Korean derived portion of the whole thing  (though dragon in Chinese Long Form has a similar section right of the radical - (龍) - however the rest does not feel Korean at all. The three dots are reminscent of Short Form Chinese (e.g. here is "school" in long and short form, and you can see how the top of the character was reduced to three small marks:   -  ). The bottom could be an "s" (ㅅ) or possibly based on Japanese "he" (へ).

If I had to guess, based on context of the story, I would guess this is Torio for Yoki-hijo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ShardPug said:

They are stylish chinese characters / Japanese Hanji for the noodle place sign.

They words are 麪媛 ,meaning: Noodle Princess

Good catch. That's why I did not speculate on my "Character" based section above - my character vocabulary is low (a few hundred of the most common Hanja used in Korean) with enough knowledge to look them up in my dictionaries - when they are "legible" enough for me to determine radiacal and stroke count. This does seem like a derivation of the Kanji you mentioned though - very similar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 7/10/2023 at 5:17 AM, ShardPug said:

They are stylish chinese characters / Japanese Hanji for the noodle place sign.

They words are 麪媛 ,meaning: Noodle Princess

 

On 7/10/2023 at 7:08 AM, Treamayne said:

Good catch. That's why I did not speculate on my "Character" based section above - my character vocabulary is low (a few hundred of the most common Hanja used in Korean) with enough knowledge to look them up in my dictionaries - when they are "legible" enough for me to determine radiacal and stroke count. This does seem like a derivation of the Kanji you mentioned though - very similar.

Thank you so much!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...