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Shadows of Self speculations


kroen

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Do you think it'll continue Wax's story or will it only introduce new characters? Either way, I think that one of POV's will of be of an Augur or an Oracle, just on the base of the name. For a second I thought this novel will be talking about a Seer, with atium returning in some cool way, but atium shows you shadows of others, not yourself... and given that we've already read of an Augur, I think (and hope) that this time it'll be an Oracle.

Edited by kroen
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Well, as far as Wax vs. only new characters, Brandon has also referred to sequels as more Wax and Wayne stories, so there's that. As far as the the title, I actually think that we're looking at a kandra reference. I don't actually have the book, so I can't cite it exactly, but in one of the TenSoon scenes in HoA, one of the kandra make an oblique reference to them still having "the shadow of self." I noticed this because I had already heard the title for the Alloy sequel when I read it, so I was intrigued as to what this might be. It was not further addressed.

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The shadow of self is actually a reference to what's left of Leras's mind.

"That is impossible," Haddek said. "Preservation's power remains, for power cannot be destroyed. His mind, however, was all but destroyed—for this was the sacrifice he made to imprison Ruin."

"The sliver remains," another reminded. "The shadow of self."

Maybe we'll get more insight into how much of Sazed's original self remains?
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The shadow of self is actually a reference to what's left of Leras's mind.Maybe we'll get more insight into how much of Sazed's original self remains?

 

I thought that Shadows of Self only was brought into question because Leras used his mind to fuel Ruin's prison.  300 years is nothing to a Shard, I doubt that Sazed will be changed much from his original state, besides changes that occurred immediately with his ascension. 

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I think it's safe to assume the title will pay off in multiple ways, as many of Brandon's titles do.  Alloy of Law's main interpretation is the one put forward by Miles, in which he says something about enforcing an alloy of the law rather than the law itself, basically asserting each human's ability to choose for themselves what is right and wrong, and the ability of those with powers, like Miles and Wax, to impose, in some ways, their choices on others.  It could also refer to the mixing of magic systems, and metals, that produce the extraordinary powers of Twinborn, or the combination of new and old, or urban and rural ideologies and culture.  These of course, are just a few of the many interpretations of Alloy of Law's title.  Another good example is the many applications of the final part of Hero of Ages, entitled "Trust".

 

Now, not all of Brandon's titles carry so much meaning.  Some, like Elantris, and The Mistborn trilogy are fairly descriptive and straight forward, but I've noticed his more recent books, The Emperor's Soul, Alloy of Law, The Way of Kings, and Warbreaker (okay, not so recent, but more recent than Elantris or the first of the Mistborn books), have been more inclined to have multiple meanings.  Since Shadows of Self isn't obvious in it's descriptive elements, I think it's safe to assume it too will be invested with multiple levels of meaning.

 

I like the electrum and gold misting connection, and the connection to what Haddek says about the Mist Spirit.  I could see both of these things coming up in some way during this book, but perhaps neither will be the focus (of the two, I'd guess the mistings one is more likely to take preeminence).  It could also refer to Wax and his continued struggle with his identity as both noble and lawman, an inner struggle that might be intensified as he begins to investigate his uncle's schemes.  He'll likely have to ask himself what kind of lord or leader he is, and clarify what is important to him.  From his brief appearance at the end of AoL, the former Lord Ladrian already seems like a character of ambiguous morality, who might be adept at forcing others to question their own morality.

 

Another avenue the book might explore, is it might give us further info about the killer who Wax was hunting in the prologue (forget his name and don't have my book handy), who is speculated to have possibly been using atium. 

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I just assumed that Shadows of Self would follow Wax because Sanderson hints pretty loudly that there's more to happen between him and Marasi. But if there's info on Sazed, I'm all in. :)

I like Steris better overall, and for Wax in particular, but we haven't seen a whole lot of her so far.  There's not much love for the tsundere here.  Her businesslike demeanor to everything developed because she had high expectations placed upon her by her family's station. She was an interesting counterpoint to Wax who decided to turn his back on his family to live in the Roughs. Her particular response to marriage and relationships was influenced by her own father's infidelity to her mother. She didn't include a clause for mistresses in the marriage contract because she wants her husband to cheat on her; she just came to expect affairs because of her mother and father's relationship. Still, she and Marasi seem to care for each other, so I don't think she held that against her half-sister.

 

I think all that BS was hinting about Marasi is that she wasn't the right girl for Wax, partially because she was a lot like his ex.

 

I wouldn't mind if Marasi ended up with Wayne or something.

 

I imagine the next book will involve the people from the other continent to some small degree, and the kidnapped women from the first book is still a viable topic as well.  I'd also like Steries and Wax to get married, but I'm in no rush.

Edited by Cheese Ninja
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A couple of useful (I think) quotes on these subjects.

ZAS678 (REDDIT.COM)
A little safer question- Why did you not have Waxillium fall for Marasi? Why stick with the contract with Steris?

BRANDON SANDERSON (REDDIT.COM)
Marasi, as she was in Alloy of Law, was just plain wrong for Wax. As I write books, I allow my characters to grow more free-form (while my setting and plot are outlined in detail.) In writing the book, I felt that a Marasi hook-up at the end would not only be wrong for the character, but wrong for the story. If I do direct sequels (which I probably will) perhaps things will change.
Source

 

 

2. What's up at the south end of the world (during the 'closer to the sun' phase)? Life there? Cultures? Allomancers? Assuming that there is some life down there, can we assume that we'll have some interesting 'culture clashes' in future books?

They will be known by the modern trilogy, so it's safe to assume that a discovery will happen soon. Either during the Alloy of Law era or soon after.
Source

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