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sniperfrog

04/19/2021 - SniperFrog - The Trials Prologue version 2 - (2714)(V,G,L)

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So I have been workshopping this for a couple months now. I needed a prologue that set the stakes for my characters while also making sense with the rest of  the timeline. This is basically split into three parts. I have been trying to get these ironed out, but I know there are still a few wrinkles here and there. 

 
My previous prologue was not very good. I wanted to have a look at the events leading up to the end of the Starfalls, but the more I worked on the story, the less it mattered to the plot. So I took a couple of flashbacks and rewrote them to be the prologue. Hopefully this helps establish who my characters are and their motivations in the rest of the story. 
 
The part titled The Last Day is basically a stand alone passage that establishes some events that are delved into a bit later. I felt like this would fit in the beginning to give readers a bit of something to look forward to. It is meant to be a little bit on the cryptic side. 
 
I am mostly looking for feedback on whether these events set up the motivations of the characters from my previous submissions in a believable way. Particularly the scene in the Guild Hall, as this basically explains the reasons for P and C to be hunting the Knights in the first place. Also, let me know how the dialogue feels in this scene. I feel like it could still use some touching up in areas.
 
For a little reference, I have mathed out my character ages to save you guys the trouble. P and C are twins. In the prologue they are around the age of five in our years (seven in world) and about 25 (37 in world) once the story gets back into the present. V is about 21 (30 in world). I had originally written this to be a 20 year gap between the story and prologue, but I decided that I wanted the characters to be a little older, so I changed this to a 30 year gap instead. Hopefully this isn't too confusing. You'll have to let me know if that even makes sense. 
 
I have attached my timeline to this. It includes some worldbuilding information and a synopsis for most of the chapters I have written so far. A few of these are just plot outlining things, but overall they help me keep things straight. I also attached my map. It isn't quite finished, but all of the important bits are in place. 
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I'll react to these parts one at a time as I read.

The Last Day:

I think this is leaning a bit too heavily into being cryptic and mysterious. I don't get what's going on, a bunch of different things are being referenced, and at this point I'm not invested in any characters, plot or world, so I don't have a drive to read on and work out what this is about.

If you think it's important to your book to have a cryptic teaser intro, I suggest picking one element to highlight for the reader to latch onto. As it is now, you have a dying world, a dying character, a blade, a goddess, and hints at complicated plot stuff involving belief and a champion. If I found this in a bookshop, then assuming I read past this point, I'm not going to remember all that. What's the one important thing you want me to take away from this passage?

 

House M's Exile:

The good news is that the characters' motivations are set up. I know why P and C are hunting the Knights (because the council bad guys will kill them otherwise), and I think I know why the council is going along with this (because it's a win-win situation for them). The dialogue feels archaic, but I think that's what you're going for, and I don't see any big issues beyond the fact that some of it could be trimmed.

The bad news is that there's a lot of exposition here that isn't very engaging. The drama of the scene is about these two kids narrowly escaping death by council. The information about the Knights of O, the Monster of M, and the backstory there feels like too much at once, and it's not immediately relevant to the scene. I suggest either moving all that extra info to another point where it becomes relevant, or finding a way to work it in organically.

The further bad news is that I don't feel very attached to these kids. From your notes I gather that they're both supposed to be five years old, but from reading it, I got the sense that they were older (like maybe tweens). More importantly, I couldn't tell you much about who they are beyond P being scared and C having a bright idea.

I also couldn't tell you much about the councilmen. In aggregate they're clearly a nasty bunch, but individually, I don't have a sense for them.

 

FKs Escape:

This works better than the others because it doesn't have the infodump problem. I get a better sense of T's character than I got of the other characters, but it's still mostly a vague impression of a tough, grizzled veteran. I don't know what his larger goals are or what's driving him in general, but it's clear that in this scene he wants to save his buddies. I think the action could do with a little bit of trimming - the part where T is struggling with a series of guards lost my attention a bit.

Another point of concern is that I don't know much about the setting. From the weapons being used, I assume medieval-ish, and from the things going on there seem to be widespread political problems in this world. But that's about all I've got.

 

I looked over your timeline - tbh it doesn't make much sense to me. If it's just for your reference then that doesn't matter in the slightest, but if you want feedback on a synopsis/outline, you're going to have to do a bit more explaining of who's who, where's where and why things are happening.

 

As you know, I wasn't around to read your previous submissions, so I can't tell you whether the characters track or not, nor whether the info and events in these three bits are necessary/good in a prologue. But if you are trying to make this into the opening of your book, I think you need to work out how to introduce and get us invested in the protagonist (at least) and the setting. 

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In the future, it would be easier on the reader to just combine separate sections into one document. I had to figure out which order to read them in, and I wasn't really sure why the timeline was included.

On 4/18/2021 at 9:39 PM, sniperfrog said:

In the prologue they are around the age of five in our years (seven in world) and about 25 (37 in world) once the story gets back into the present.

Like @RedBlue, I did not get this at all. When they said they hadn't seen seven darknesses, I assumed that was some sort of multi-year event and they were getting close to their twenties. I don't think they acted five at all. Someone five years old doesn't have the cognition to barter against a death sentence, and for that matter, what is the council doing sentencing children to hanging? I'm also not quite sure what they're charged with. Are they saying they're going to hang children because their father killed people and escaped? That just seems cruel.

Overall, I think The Last Day was overly cryptic and it didn't do anything for me. By the time I got back to reading something it affected, I would likely have forgotten about it.

For that matter, I'm not sure we need to see the knight's escape. We're told the "bad" part, that the twin's father and friend were responsible for slaughtering forty guards. I think this is lessened by seeing that six knights can't overpower two guards. How did they slaughter forty?

The last part caught my interest a lot more because we have two protagonists in immediate danger. As above, I don't think their ages track, but assuming they were older, fending off a hanging and going into exile to track and kill their father is a pretty good hook. I think maybe just keeping this part and expanding on the twin's emotions and how they plan to deal with exile (and what that means for them) will make this much more engaging.

 

Notes while reading:
The Last Day:
--sort of getting Superman vibes with the son getting sent away from a dying land.

pg 2:
--yeah, not really sure what happened, however. I guess a goddess sent a guy somewhere? Did he kill her with the sword or not?


59th Winter
pg 2: "for them to be this dense."
--they are acting pretty dense, if they're leaving a bunch of knights unguarded. Seems plotful.

pg 2: "Even with their superior numbers, they were unlikely to give the guard much trouble."
--Also hard to believe. We saw someone's bruised face and someone else with a broken arm. But six people trained as knights can't take out two guards?

pg 3: "He had decided to expedite the process, it seemed."
--maybe a little more emotion from seeing one of his fellow knights die?

pg 3: "T hopped from the platform and melted into the crowded streets..."
--wait, isn't he going to free the other knights? I thought they were in chains so they couldn't attack the guards?


60th Winter
pg 1: "hid her face...vain attempt to hide"
--repetition

pg 1: are any of these people the same ones as the last chapter? There are a lot of names being introduced.

pg 2: "they had slaughtered"
--the siblings or the knights?

pg 2: Oooooh...the father was one of the knights. Took me a bit to figure that out. Is this what the knights were arrested for, or was that something else?

pg 3: "many Talents between the two of them.”
--so, doesn't that make them more dangerous to the councilmembers rather than more useful? They already think the siblings will turn traitor.

pg 4: "They had avoided hanging"
--not sold on this as a last sentence. It's the conclusion of the immediate event, but the reader is more curious about the rest of the story. Where will our heroes go from here? I'd like some hint about their feelings of being exiled.
 

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I'd suggest combining files next time. I have no idea what to read first.

Overall

I found this all a very choppy read, more like getting bits of a draft that hasn't been finished yet. I think the scene with the twins was the most engaging, but from the wrong POV, and would work better as a flashback during the main narrative. The other two shorts I think could be cut without affecting anything, since I couldn't get grounding in either. The writing was fine, and nothing was hard to read, I just couldn't get a handhold really in any of it except with the kids. For prologues and stuff I think, especially, you really need to hook the reader right from the first page, and that means a quick cementing of the main character and world, so you can build from there. Going right into fighting or having a POV that doesn't engage the plot makes that very difficult.

As I go

- timeline: I don't usually read front matter because I'm not invested in the characters enough to care. I made it through the first page and left it. I got that time moves differently than ours

The Last Day: there's a lot of redundancy in that first paragraph

- this two page thing is far too oblique. It doesn't hook me because I don't get any real information, other than the tropes that this story will use going forward

60th of Winter: pg 2: they had slaughtered <-- who? The children???

- pg 3: It's weird to be in the POV of the character who isn't doing anything. This chapter would be better suited to C's POV. The girl is just bobbing with the plot and being fearful. She isn't interacting

- pg 3: Not the best for us, maybe, but I can see the wheels turning behind those dark eyes of hi <-- I have an almost seven year old and I don't care how intelligent her eyes look, I wouldn't trust her to hunt down family members and bring them to justice. She can barely make canned soup on her own

- I think this little bit could be better served as a flashback during the main narrative. It doesn't stand on its own very well, especially without an introspection from the POV character. It would do much better if we got C's thoughts as he bargains

59th of winter: this was just long fight scene from characters I'm not yet invested in, in a world I don't understand. I'm not sure what the purpose of it is, since it doesn't seem to establish anything

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The others have mentioned this as well, but having everything in one document is a lot easier to look at than trying to figure out what order things go in.

59th of Winter:

The general level of language and gore is not my usual cup of tea, especially at an opening.  I don’t mind it if I’m invested in the characters and their goals, but since I usually reach for fantasy because the real world is dark and depressing enough, it can really keep me from being engaged with the characters at the start.

Pg 1:

A couple of odd sentence breaks in the first paragraph.  A fragment here or there for pacing or emphasis is fine, but in the second sentence, it just seems jarring. And the third sentence should be split into two.

No pity…looks.” I’m not sure what this is supposed to be saying. 

“…the group of traitors…” should T also be referring to them as traitors in his narrative?  The main sympathy I have for him at the moment is that he’s trying to go rescue his friends, but I have to assume they’re the ones I should be rooting for, and at the moment I don’t have a good reason to want one side or the other to succeed.  

Pg 2:

“…for them to be this dense.” So how’d our friends get caught in the first place?

“They were in worse shape than they looked.”  If they can’t do anything to help here, how do they expect to get away without getting caught and killed along the way?

The more gory murder I see from T without any understanding of what the knights are being tortured and hanged for or what horrible things the guards have done, the less sympathetic I am to him. And I didn’t know enough about him to be all that sympathetic from the start...

Pg 3:

“…only a few minutes...we need to disappear…” A bunch of horribly tortured prisoners seem like they would be difficult to hide in a crowd.  Especially if they need to be able to move quickly.

 

60th of Winter:

(based on your age explanation in the e-mail) P seems far more coherent and introspective than a five year old should be.  And the thought of either of them understanding what a charge of treason means, or anything else of what the councilman says, is a big stretch.  Especially after having undergone something so traumatic.  There’s just far too much reasoning and processing and understanding of what’s going on for me to buy the age.  I’d expect them to be closer to mid-teens at least for the strings of thought here. And even then, I’d expect a lot more flat out terror.

The kids are more sympathetic than T was, since it’s easy enough to assume they aren’t at fault and that they are being wronged here, so you want them to get away safe.  And I think that would hold if they were old enough here to make the rest of it more feasible. 

If they want to finish off the family, what’s stopping them from quietly doing away with two children.  What benefit do they think a farcical trial and public execution of two children is going to achieve?  Is there anyone standing in the kids’ defense who they have to appease?

There are a lot of names being thrown around and a lot of people saying things that I don’t have good reference points for.  If we are focusing on the kids’ motivations, focusing in on the specific things they are afraid of and how they think they can fix it seems like it’s going to be a stronger approach.  Right now there’s a lot of information that isn’t directly relevant to their motivations that is getting in the way of things being engaging.

I think it provides a clear reason for them wanting to find the knights, which is great, but I don’t know enough about where the full story is going to know if it would work better as a prologue or as a flashback later.

 

The Last Day:

I just really can’t tie enough things together here to make much sense of it. I think cryptic scenes need a more solid throughline to ground the reader in what they can know so that they are curious about what they don’t know. But without that, I mostly felt lost.  I like puzzles and stringing together vague hints in stories. But I need something to suggest what pieces I need to hang on to for later and what pieces I can let slide, and I had a hard time doing that here.  There’s a guy and a sword and a goddess.  But I don’t know what else I’m supposed to try to keep in my head.

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In case there was any doubt in your mind, I agree with the others about combining everything into one document.

The Last Day:

I'll be honest and say I tend to kinda read over cryptic stuff at the beginning of fantasy novels in general, so it's hard to capture my interest with this. And this wasn't quite there in hooking me. It's fine for it to be mysterious, but the best cryptic passages have something that's easy to latch onto to keep us engaged for the mystery. In this regard, I think it's ironically more important for this section to be concrete than anywhere else, and right now it's very abstract. No clue what's going on and not enough there for me within arm's reach to feel like I should really focus on this part.

59th of winter:

I read this second because I assumed it was a date that came earlier. My main comment here is that I couldn't really get my bearings. Not in terms of what was physically happening (I understood that there was a fight with the guards), but why any of it was happening and the personality/motivation/hook/conflict of our friend T. I'm trying to find a way to word this in a way that's accurate since it wasn't bad by any means, but it was kinda hard for me to care when I really didn't understand why anything was happening. It felt like the action was a band-aid to cover up the fact that we don't get too much plot or character here. 

60th of winter: 

Immediately I understand the conflict and stakes much better than in the previous sections. I strongly agree with the others that P and C don't seem 5 at all. I would have guessed like mid teens. The idea of sending literal five year olds off to kill their parent (and that the five year olds would come up with this idea and the adults agree to it) is a pretty big issue for me. Not in the moral sense, but it makes so little logical sense to me that I'm starting to question everything else I read and whether or not the people there are biologically similar to us at all. Also in this case I don't really care as much about the reason they're being charged. It's bs, I know it's bs, the kids know it's bs, the council knows it's bs. 

It's also not clear to me why they're letting the kids go along with it. I can't really see the kids doing anything other than fleeing the political jurisdiction of the council (leaving the state, country, wherever they are) and never coming back. If they want to hang the kids, they're not going to be swayed by anything the kids have to say. 

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To be honest, my main issue is that I'm not familiar with the characters and that I spent most of my time reading trying to figure out who was who and who was speaking or narrating. Also I agree about the kids' ages thing; I thought they were maybe mid-teens.

The Last Day: 

pg 1 "the chain's links...": what chains?

Once out of the italicized portion, I got confused about who was narrating, especially with the vagueness from "A voice" and so on. I feel like a name instead of just 'he' would have been nice. Also, I didn't get what the relation between the italicized part and the rest of it was. Also, the last line completely threw me off. Is it referring to like reincarnation? Because that's what I got from it. 

59th of Winter: 

Once again, I was confused about the characters. It took me until the action for me to realize that T was part of the traitors. Other than there being a fight between guards and prisoners/traitors, I'm pretty lost. 

Some small comments: 

pg 2 "One of them was trying...": This sentence threw me off, it might be helpful to split it up. And I didn't get how the sentence with "felt the cold metal begin..." related to the next sentence. 

pg 3 "He had decided to expedite...": Who's 'he'? And who is M (and why does/did she matter)? 

60th of Winter: 

pg 1 "C stood beside her": Reading this, I thought 'her' was meant to the council... a name sooner would have been nice imo. It took me until the end of this page to figure out who was who lol.

pg 2 "I mean, what...": You were asking about dialogue, I think, and this part stood out to me. It seemed a bit like a sudden switch from the councilman talking all formally and then going a bit more informally. 

pg 3 "It came to P...": I didn't get why she was suddenly having a flashback. Was it something the councilman said, and if so, what? 

Re: letting the kids go after their father (if I'm not mistaken): why would the councilmen do that? Aside from the kids being five thing, my immediate thought was that they're the immediate family of the traitor. Wouldn't there be some concern of a conflict of interest or allegiance? I understand that he killed their mother, but even so... 

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I actually had to come to the comments to figure out what order everyone read these in XD

The Last Stand:

At such short of a scene, I wasn't able to come to any hard and fast conclusions because by the time I start figuring out what is going on, it is over.

FK's Escape:

I'm not invested in this because there's no emotions and just action. Like, why should I care if the prisoners hang or not? T's not trying to save his mother or sister or something. I'm not even sure if they are good guys or bad guys.

HM's Exile:

They're supposed to be five? If I hadn't read your email and had kept with the assumption that they were seven, they still don't talk like children. As someone who teaches six-year-olds, this is how conversations tend to go:

Me: "Does anyone have any questions about this worksheet? Yes, Joe?"

Joe: "We're going to the park this weekend and ummm I'm going to bring my dog and my dog really like hamburgers and once this time...have you ever played Zelda? I really like the camel-My dog's name is Patches. What are we doing?"

One of my favorite kids starts off everything with "But, actually" no matter what he is going to say. "But, actually, Teacher, I need to pee."

Little kids ramble, they tend to switch topics midway, they are rarely focused on the same conversation you are, and they constantly use "ums" and such. It's adorable, often hard to understand, and becomes really obnoxious fast if you're trying to get things done. Don't forget that half the time they're staring at something way more interesting than you and mumble. 

Also, kids are not so good with grief. I have a six year old who recently lost his parents and he is terrorizing my class. They don't have the words to explain their feelings, so they lash out, destroy things, push other kids, yell at you, flat out run away, etc. If you want some more traumatic kid stories, I got plenty. Demon Boy, Stabby Girl, Stabby Girl's Runaway Brother, Couch Boy, my current kiddo...yeah...I got stories I can tell. 

Overall:

I'm overall confused, despite the fact that your writing is fine. These feel like samples from different chapters. Were you thinking about putting all three together to make a three-section prologue? Which I would not recommend. Or were you trying to figure out which one works best as a prologue? In which case, I vote HM's Exile, because that one is the only one that appears to have information that would be prevalent to the rest of the work. Which, frankly, you can probably shuffle in this information elsewhere. What are your goals and do you have a summary of your manuscript, like a back cover, so I can figure out more what you are aiming for? I feel rather in the dark, and that ties my hands. 

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Posted (edited)

I am very late this but its been a busy week!

Im going to try not to sound too repetitive because i think everyone is saying pretty much the same things. (but im probably just going to sound repetitive anyway, sorry)

So lets talk about the good things!

I think all these pieces have good bones; I see a lot of potential. With a bit more work, I could really get into this. 

I also want to mention the worldbuilding. I think it’s good, I can see the little specks of info you’ve dropped and I appreciate that. It feels like you have a lot of the world created in the background. Especially since you have a map and a timeline, though I can't make much sense of anything now.

I have a vision in my head of where I think this could go and if you go in that direction, I think it could be good. But also, I haven't quite seen what makes this different from other medieval fantasy/fiction* stories.

*(I actually don't even really know what genre this is, but there are knights sooo)

Last day:

Like others have said, it's hard to get into something when we don't have a lot of groundwork laid out for us. I think simply adding some more names sooner would make this way more understandable (because idk who is saying what). I had a hard time picturing what was going on and when I can't do that, I skim over it and tag it as unimportant. To be fair, I skim most epigraphs that don't have a lot of grounding or importance to me. They are really hard to do well, imo. Though, I do have some appreciation for what you're trying to do. But there’s so much hidden from the reader that it's just so hard to get into. 

I don't know how important this piece is to the story but if you really want to keep it, you should add more sensory words and describe things more. Paint us a clearer picture. I also think scenes like this definitely work better in film. There's more wiggle room for cryptic vague intros when we can actually see what's going on.

59th:

I think we have a solid start. There’s more description here and I can picture what's going on in my head. But, like the previous doc, there’s a bit too much hidden from the reader. I found that readers don’t really like when you hide things from them (most of the time) I mean, you can do a mystery well without it feeling like anything has been hidden. But it seems like there's some information we might be missing here. I think you can sprinkle it in and at the same time, flesh out your characters more. Give us more hints about what's going on, maybe through their thoughts. It would also be an excellent time for more worldbuilding. 

We have Tom and his goal is clear, to save his comrades. But why? What did they do? Maybe we don't exactly need that information now but a hint would be good: just a short sentence from Tom’s voice that tells us what is going on. Tom could definitely be an unreliable narrator and maybe use hyperbole to explain to us what is going on (at least that’s the direction I could see him going). Tell us why they are considered traitors and raise the stakes. I felt like the tension was lacking in this because Tom just blew through those guards. Like others have said, too much action, not enough emotion, unclear stakes.

60th:

I don’t really have anything to say that hasn't been said but once you iron these out, I can see it being really good. Especially if you continue to switch between the kids hunting their father and the POV of their fathers companions, I could see it being really interesting if (when) they ever finally meet.

I do like that the characters from the previous bit are noted here. That makes things feel more connected.

I think the lowest age you could get away with is 12, but even then they'd have to be really smart twelve year olds.

Edited by karamel
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On 4/24/2021 at 1:27 PM, Snakenaps said:

 If you want some more traumatic kid stories, I got plenty. Demon Boy, Stabby Girl, Stabby Girl's Runaway Brother, Couch Boy, my current kiddo...yeah...I got stories I can tell.

um, you have piqued my interest. :o

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On 4/25/2021 at 3:14 PM, karamel said:

 

On 4/24/2021 at 1:27 PM, Snakenaps said:

 If you want some more traumatic kid stories, I got plenty. Demon Boy, Stabby Girl, Stabby Girl's Runaway Brother, Couch Boy, my current kiddo...yeah...I got stories I can tell.

um, you have piqued my interest. :o

 

Your wish is my command. @sniperfrog maybe I can provide you with some inspiration. 

Keep in mind, I've only taught for about three years. Imagine what stories a teacher of 20-30 years can tell.

Demon Boy: Six years old, first grade. During my student teaching, I had this kid who was a complete sweetheart when he was okay. But when he wasn't? He made the other kids pee themselves in fear and forced us to evacuate the class. Punched my co-teacher and threatened to kill the school psychologist and the principal. Nearly stabbed me with a pencil but caught his emotions last second. Would become, in his words, "demon possessed" when his emotions got too high. Threw chairs and desks, would become convinced he was in a video game. His mother had him when he was 15 and constantly missed his meetings, leaving his grandfather to pick up the slack. School was able to intervene and got him in a special program for the emotionally disturbed. From what I hear, he's back in general education and is doing great.

Stabby Girl and Her Brother: Both kids were born addicted, were being cared for by their grandmother. Both kids were angels when they were okay. When they weren't? Well, it was tough.

Stabby Girl was in third grade. Stabby Girl started out with throwing things around the classroom and threatening to drink the essential oils for the humidifier (she didn't want me to go to lunch). Escalated to when I was taking out new pencils from the shelf and giving them to her. Something...went wrong. Triggered her. Next thing I know, I have a brand new sharp pencil coming at me. Caught her wrist, looked into her eyes and realized she was seeing red, not me. She escaped my grasp, went after other students. I evacuated the classroom. Ironically, I would later trust her with a butter knife to carve soap with. I became her favorite sub and the only one that was allowed anywhere remotely near her. The reason she liked me? Because of how well I treated her brother.

Her younger brother attended first grade...kinda. He mostly played with Play-do in front of the guinea pig or slept. Trying to get him to do anything was like trying to herd cats. His worst day was non-violent, but he ran away from the classroom nine times in one day. I got very good at calling the office that day. He was very frustrating to teach, but I liked him as a kid. He was very loving.

Couch Boy: Second grade. Disappeared. Luckily, one of the kids saw him hide under the couch. I would slowly build up a relationship with him over the course of several months of subbing so that he didn't hide under the couch every time he felt frightened.  

Test Boy: Had an 8th grader who didn't take kindly to teachers, let alone subs. I told him that if he spoke during the test one more time, I'd take it away. He then learned I meant what I said. I obviously didn't give him the test back, even though he begged all day. He would later get in a fist fight with another kid during PE (luckily the school psychologist was right there when this broke out in front of me). I also got him in major trouble when he was "joking" around with a small boy and saying...things that are not appropriate for this server. He later gave me less grief when I discovered he wanted to travel and gave him a bunch of resources and advice.

Savage: First grade, always wore a hat that said "Savage". Parents died and he wasn't handling the grief well. Unlike Stabby Girl, her brother, Demon Boy, or Couch Boy...this kid was always in control of his emotions. Little twinkle in his eye. He was vindictive and smart, which was very dangerous. Would repeatedly run away and my poor, wonderful principal would have to chase him around. Came to the realization that if he broke enough rules and acted out enough, school would send him home. Pushed down two of my kids, tried to get the others in trouble, cut up his shirt, spun around in the teacher's chair, yelled over me, tried to say the most hurtful things he could come up with towards me (jokes on him, he was in class so little that I don't think he knew my name, let alone anything that could hurt my feelings). One day, he came in, looked around, and said, "I won't be here long." He was right. His behavior got him sent home...again. I hope they are able to get him the help he desperately needs.  

Of course, these are my rough kids, but I could write a book about the wonderful kids I have had. 

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Wow @Snakenaps that's... quite the set of stories for someone who's only been teaching for 3 years. Every time I wonder if I want to teach grade school, I wonder if I have the ability to deal with stuff like that. 

Glad to hear that you've had a bunch of wonderful kids though! :) 

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4 hours ago, Ace of Hearts said:

Wow @Snakenaps that's... quite the set of stories for someone who's only been teaching for 3 years. Every time I wonder if I want to teach grade school, I wonder if I have the ability to deal with stuff like that. 

Glad to hear that you've had a bunch of wonderful kids though! :) 

If you had asked me four years ago if I would have been able to handle it, I would have said no. There are days where I still feel like that. But it is amazing what you can do when challenged. 

I plan to leave education, but not because of the kids. I will miss their smiles and lightbulb moments and art and just watching kids be kids before adulthood squashes the carefree from them. They say that you never know the difference you make in a kid's life, but kids don't realize the differences they make in yours. 

If you think you might want to teach grade school...volunteer! It's a great way to get your feet wet without costing you a college education. I did 136 hours before I got my credential. 

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