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CameronUluvara

Is Alethi derived from Hallandren?

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The first letter of the Hallandren alphabet is shash, which is also an Alethi glyph that means dangerous. 

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Nope, just coincidence:

 

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Ryan J. Kelly

Re-reading Warbreaker by Brandon Sanderson I had my mind blown by seeing the word "shash." I hadn't remembered that by the time I read TWoK.

Peter Ahlstrom

That's actually a coincidence. Just a convergence of phonology.

General Twitter 2014 (Feb. 24, 2014)

 

 

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Questioner

So I have a question about the cosmere. I recently read The Stormlight Archive books and I love them, and then I reread Warbreaker and I noticed something. When Siri was teaching the God King how to read, she says one of the letters is called shash and this is the name of one of Kaladin's slave brands. I was wondering why.

Brandon Sanderson

It was just a coincidence, that one's been asked of me before, yeah it's just a coincidence.

Salt Lake City ComicCon 2017 (Sept. 23, 2017)

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Just for the record, Hallandren is less than a thousand years old at the time of Way of Kings (~600 years old as of Warbreaker, which takes place in the ~300 year gap between Mistborn Era 1 and Stormlight Archive) while Alethkar goes back thousands of years to the kingdom of Alethela and the glyphs are even older than that. I'm not sure we know how old Hallandren's alphabet is since it likely predates the nation but I'm guessing 'not that old'.

This isn't the only example of a linguistic convergence that doesn't actually mean anything. Another is Ati, which is the name of Ruin's original Vessel and also the name of an Aon. Brandon has confirmed that it's a coincidence and Aon Ati was named after one of his wife's students. Tons of similarities in the Cosmere are deliberate but every so often, there are coincidences. :D

Edited by Weltall
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45 minutes ago, Weltall said:

Just for the record, Hallandren is less than a thousand years old at the time of Way of Kings (~600 years old as of Warbreaker, which takes place in the ~300 year gap between Mistborn Era 1 and Stormlight Archive) while Alethkar goes back thousands of years to the kingdom of Alethela and the glyphs are even older than that. I'm not sure we know how old Hallandren's alphabet is since it likely predates the nation but I'm guessing 'not that old'.

This isn't the only example of a linguistic convergence that doesn't actually mean anything. Another is Ati, which is the name of Ruin's original Vessel and also the name of an Aon. Brandon has confirmed that it's a coincidence and Aon Ati was named after one of his wife's students. Tons of similarities in the Cosmere are deliberate but every so often, there are coincidences. :D

Ironically, Aon Ati translates to "hope." 

To the OP; my guess based on various WoBs is that most humans descend from people who came from the same planet, Yolen, so various Cosmere languages are derived from an older language similar to how English, French, Spanish, ect. are all derived from Latin.  

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5 hours ago, Harrycrapper said:

similar to how English, French, Spanish, ect. are all derived from Latin. 

Strictly this isn't true, though at some level you start arguing about the word derived and it all takes on a very different tone. English is classed as a Germanic language (though there are a lot of Latin influences), so it shares a more recent "common ancestor" (to use biological terminology) with any of German, Norwegian, Icelandic, etc. than with any language outside of that. Spanish and French are both Romance languages, descended from Latin with a sprinkle of local flair and a few hundred miles acting over a few thousand years thrown in for good measure. Romance languages don't share a common ancestor with Germanic languages probably until a good few hundred or more likely thousand years before any country claimed to be called Rome or Greece.

Unfortunately it's really difficult to say exactly when the different branches of Indo-European languages split though, because we weren't exactly writing much back then, let alone handing out dictionaries designed to last four thousand years.  

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