Wit Beyond Measure

[OB] Will the Real Voidbringer Please Stand Up?

13 posts in this topic

If I am late to this party, I apologize.  I read WoK and WoR last year on a very superficial level.  This month, I reread both before OB while taking copious notes on all three.  And so I was among the genuinely shocked by the we-are-the-monsters reveal.  We are the Voidbringers.

Quote

“It’s true, then?” [Kaladin] finally said. “About the parshmen. That this was their land, their world, before we arrived? That … that we were the Voidbringers?”

[Syl] nodded. “Odium is the void, Kaladin. He draws in emotion, and doesn’t let it go. You … you brought him with you. I wasn’t alive then, but I know this truth. He was your first god, before you turned to Honor.”

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 1202). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

4

But not all Roshar humans are Voidbringers, right?  I mean, Kaladin and Dalinar have taken enormous steps in bridging the divide between humans and Parshendi.  

From the historical version of WoR:

Quote

And when they were spoken of by the common folk, the Releasers claimed to be misjudged because of the dreadful nature of their power; and when they dealt with others, always were they firm in their claim that other epithets, notably “Dustbringers,” often heard in the common speech, were unacceptable substitutions, in particular for their similarity to the word “Voidbringers.” They did also exercise anger in great prejudice regarding it, though to many who speak, there was little difference between these two assemblies.

Sanderson, Brandon. Words of Radiance (The Stormlight Archive, Book 2) (p. 418). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

1

From the second viewing of Dalinar's first vision with Honor in WoK:

Quote

“That is what could happen,” the figure said, nodding into the distance. “It’s what I fear will happen. It’s what he wants. The True Desolation.”

No, that wall in the air wasn’t a highstorm. It wasn’t rain making that enormous shadow, but blowing dust. He remembered this vision in full, now. It had ended here, with him confused, staring out at that oncoming wall of dust.

...

The land was trembling. The wall of dust was being caused by something. Something approaching.

The ground was falling away.

Dalinar gasped. The very rocks ahead were shattering, breaking apart, becoming dust. He backed away as everything began to shake, a massive earthquake accompanied by a terrible roar of dying rocks.

...

Around it, the land was gone. Kholinar was gone. It had all fallen away into unplumbed darkness below.

...

He looked over the pinnacle’s sheer edge, down at a void, horrified.

...

“You cannot squabble as in times past. He’s realized that you, given time, will become your own enemies. That he doesn’t need to fight you. Not if he can make you forget, make you turn against one another.

Sanderson, Brandon. The Way of Kings (The Stormlight Archive, Book 1) (p. 995-7). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

3

And then from Oathbringer, we find an enormous rift between the Dustbringer spren (ashspren) and Honor and his Radiants:

Quote

“Spark is fine with what we’re doing,” Malata said, pressing her finger down and adding another swirl to the table. “I told you, the rest of them are idiots. They assume all the spren are going to be on their side. Never mind what the Radiants did to Spark’s friends, never mind that organized devotion to Honor is what killed hundreds of ashspren in the first place.”

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 1002). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

 

So Dustbringers = Voidbringers?  And once Honor realizes that the Dustbringer-Voidbringers will bring about the True Desolation of the entire planet, he advocates the killing of ashspren?  But that sprenicide might be the main impetus for the True Desolation in the first place, right? 

And so Odium wants us to turn against one another and squabble and bicker and make the Dustbringers angry.  Humans will turn against one another and destroy themselves with the Voidbringer weapon of mass destruction.  We are our own worst enemies, which is why he keeps telling Dalinar that he must "unite them."  Unite the people. Unite the Radiants.

(Unite the Heralds.  Unite the humans and Parshendi.  Unite the realms.  Unite the Shards.) 

5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think there's a few points against this theory.

First of all, Odium is the void that draws in emotion, according to Syl. As we've seen in Oathbringer, he takes your emotion if you let him, and nothing remains, and through that, he brings the void. Surgebinding, however, seems to be of Honor (at the very least, the spren that are required for the Nahel bond are of Honor and Cultivation), which supposedly means that Surgebinding (at least as we know it) has no connection to Odium. Additionally, there is the seperate "Voidbinding" magic system, which can probably be assumed to be from Odium, also considering Syl's information, and it most likely contains counterparts to Surgebinding. (I personally believe both are systems created by Shards to use an underlying magic system from Adonalsium's time)

Second, the Dustbringers have no unique powers, except maybe their resonance (which I would expect to be less important than which Surges they have access to). They share Division with the Skybreakers and Abrasion with the Edgedancers, so if their powers would destroy the world, then at least one of the adjacent orders (most likely Skybreakers, as they share Division) would have the same risk, and there is no real stigma attached to them. And yes, they did join Team Odium in Oathbringer, but I don't think that means they wish to end the world; their reasoning is actually that he rules because there is no one to oppose him, and therefore he makes the law, which means their reasoning is in no way related to Odium's goal.

And third, Malata is most likely just referring to the Recreance, where the Dustbringers as well as the other orders (except Skybreakers) killed their spren. It is, at the very least, extremely hard to kill a spren if you don't have a Nahel bond to it, and I wouldn't be surprised if it is impossible without a huge amount of investiture. On top of that, I highly doubt any of the sentient spren would be okay with humans killing other sentient spren, so people would probably kill their own spren by going against ther Ideals once they'd try kiling ashspren.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

Second, the Dustbringers have no unique powers, except maybe their resonance (which I would expect to be less important than which Surges they have access to). They share Division with the Skybreakers and Abrasion with the Edgedancers, so if their powers would destroy the world, then at least one of the adjacent orders (most likely Skybreakers, as they share Division) would have the same risk, and there is no real stigma attached to them.

I would think the Skybreakers devotion to law would be a point in their favor as far as "not likely to destroy the world".

8 hours ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

And third, Malata is most likely just referring to the Recreance, where the Dustbringers as well as the other orders (except Skybreakers) killed their spren.

Maybe, but it does seem like they're referencing something more specific. More intentional. Like perhaps the intent was to kill the ashspren and the other orders were collateral?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the first point:

8 hours ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

First of all, Odium is the void that draws in emotion, according to Syl. As we've seen in Oathbringer, he takes your emotion if you let him, and nothing remains, and through that, he brings the void. Surgebinding, however, seems to be of Honor (at the very least, the spren that are required for the Nahel bond are of Honor and Cultivation), which supposedly means that Surgebinding (at least as we know it) has no connection to Odium. Additionally, there is the seperate "Voidbinding" magic system, which can probably be assumed to be from Odium, also considering Syl's information, and it most likely contains counterparts to Surgebinding. (I personally believe both are systems created by Shards to use an underlying magic system from Adonalsium's time)

13

Odium is the emotional void, yes.  Only when one let's Odium in can he bring an emotional void, a void that might destroy a person but not a world.  That isn't the True Desolation.  The truly frightening, truly dangerous void is the physical void, the destroyer of worlds:  the physical void that Dalinar sees in his first vision and that destroyed the original world of the humans.  Not emotional.  Physical.

Though much Surgebinding seems of Honor and Stormlight, both Lift and Wit use Surges seemingly without Stormlight.

Eila Stele, the oldest document in written memory in the language of the Dawnchant (the Dawnsingers = singers = Parshendi), provides witness of the first coming of the Voidbringers before the first Desolation:

Quote

“ ‘They came from another world,’ ” Navani said, reading from her sheet. “ ‘Using powers that we have been forbidden to touch. Dangerous powers, of spren and Surges. They destroyed their lands and have come to us begging.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 1043). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

1

The implication from Eila Stele is that Voidbringers brought their Surges from another world, a world they destroyed using those Surges.

And Adolin says the Fused are Surgebinders:

Quote

Adolin turned as some Fused coursed through the sky along the distant wall. Enemy Surgebinders. Storms.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 799). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

 

On the second point:

8 hours ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

Second, the Dustbringers have no unique powers, except maybe their resonance (which I would expect to be less important than which Surges they have access to). They share Division with the Skybreakers and Abrasion with the Edgedancers, so if their powers would destroy the world, then at least one of the adjacent orders (most likely Skybreakers, as they share Division) would have the same risk, and there is no real stigma attached to them. And yes, they did join Team Odium in Oathbringer, but I don't think that means they wish to end the world; their reasoning is actually that he rules because there is no one to oppose him, and therefore he makes the law, which means their reasoning is in no way related to Odium's goal.

13

Yes, Division is the dustbringing power of destruction, common to both Dustbringers and Skybreakers, where bringing dust and breaking the sky imply the destructive power of Division that they share in common. 

Both Dustbringers and Skybreakers seem to have a stigma attached to them.

Pattern says Dustbringers are destroyers:

Quote

“Well,” Shallan whispered, “she’s annoying.”

“Mmm…” Pattern said. “It will be worse when she starts destroying things.”

“Destroying?”

Dustbringer,” Pattern said. “Her spren … mmm … they like to break what is around them. They want to know what is inside.”

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 277). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

2

The Diagram named Dustbringers as their BFFs:

Quote

Adrotagia attempted to secure an emotional bond with this lesser Diagram member who had suddenly been thrust into its upper echelons, an event predicted by the Diagram—which explained that the Dustbringers would be the Radiants most likely to accept their cause.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 566). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

 

Syl admonishes Kal for thinking like a Skybreaker after Kal regrets telling Dalinar of Amaram because he wants to find his own justice:

Quote

“You’re not a Skybreaker, Kaladin,” Syl finally said. “You’re not supposed to be like this.”

Sanderson, Brandon. Words of Radiance (The Stormlight Archive, Book 2) (p. 295). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

 

And both the WoR historical book and Teshav talk about how much Dustbringers hate the term for its similarity to the term Voidbringer.

On the third point:

8 hours ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

And third, Malata is most likely just referring to the Recreance, where the Dustbringers as well as the other orders (except Skybreakers) killed their spren. It is, at the very least, extremely hard to kill a spren if you don't have a Nahel bond to it, and I wouldn't be surprised if it is impossible without a huge amount of investiture. On top of that, I highly doubt any of the sentient spren would be okay with humans killing other sentient spren, so people would probably kill their own spren by going against ther Ideals once they'd try kiling ashspren.

13

The quote definitely speaks specifically of what Honor and Radiants did to "ashspren" and to "Spark's friends."  "Never mind what the Radiants did to Spark’s friends, never mind that organized devotion to Honor is what killed hundreds of ashspren in the first place.” 

If the ashspren were only angry about the normal Recreance, then they would be angrier and less trusting of the Dustbringers like Malata who killed them rather than the other Radiants, as implied by the quote.

*********************

On a tangential new point:

The Recreance brings up a great point I wanted to make:  The knowledge that humans were invaders and conquerors many millenia ago isn't what caused the Recreance where the Radiants abandoned their oaths and killed their spren.  Instead, the Recreance came from the Radiants discovering that they themselves were the monsters, the Voidbringers who would eventually bring the True Desolation.  Why would Radiants keep being Radiant if they knew that being Radiant would destroy the world? 

(It seems to me like the Radiants didn't understand which particular Surge and therefore which Orders were the Voidbringers and perhaps thought all were Voidbringers.)

One Order did not abandon their oaths, however.  The Skybreakers, particularly Nale, saw it as their mission to prevent the True Desolation by killing all of those who could bring the void.

While about to execute Lift:

Quote

“There are tons of people who do wrong things,” she said. She had to force out every word. Talking was hard. Thinking was hard. So tired. “You . . . you coulda hunted big crime bosses, murderers. You chose me instead. Why?”

“Others may be detestable, but they do not dabble in arts that could return Desolation to this world.” His words were so cold. “What you are must be stopped.”

Sanderson, Brandon. Words of Radiance (The Stormlight Archive, Book 2) (p. 705). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

1

Ironically, it is he who must be stopped, not Lift.  But such are the joys that Sanderson gives us!  Delicious ironies.  Truths.  And lies!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On the point about Dustbringers, the Part 3 epigraphs of Oathbringer did a great job of showing that at least historically they were not the sorts of violent, destructive people a lot of us assumed they were before Oathbringer. This doesn't strike me as misdirection on Brandon's part as the misdirection would be for the present era whereby due to the Recreance, the Ashspren have abandoned Honour which we knew about anyway. Every time we have seen Dustbringers historically, primarily one of Dalinar's visions where one fights a Thunderclast and in the aforementioned epigraphs they have been acting exactly as one would expect from a Knights Radiant. @Wit Beyond Measure I think perhaps you are overreading that one WOR epigraph a little bit much.

For reference here are those OB epigraphs 

Quote

 

"If this is to be permanent, then I wish to leave record of my husband and children. Wzmal, as good a man as any woman could dream of loving. Kmakra and Molinar, the true gemstones of my life. - Drawer 12-15, Ruby" - Chapter 59 epigraph

"Good night, dear Urithiru. Good night, sweet Sibling. Good night, Radiants. - Drawer 29-29, Ruby" - Chapter 87 epigraph

 

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

Though much Surgebinding seems of Honor and Stormlight, both Lift and Wit use Surges seemingly without Stormlight.

I can't remember that. Where do we see it?

3 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

Eila Stele, the oldest document in written memory in the language of the Dawnchant (the Dawnsingers = singers = Parshendi), provides witness of the first coming of the Voidbringers before the first Desolation:

Quote

“ ‘They came from another world,’ ” Navani said, reading from her sheet. “ ‘Using powers that we have been forbidden to touch. Dangerous powers, of spren and Surges. They destroyed their lands and have come to us begging.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 1043). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

1

The implication from Eila Stele is that Voidbringers brought their Surges from another world, a world they destroyed using those Surges.

Yup, this is why I think Surgebinding actually predates the Shards. It is at least theorized, and might even be said in-world (I'm not entirely certain) that the reason for the Ideals is to limit the Surgebinding, making it safe to use.

Additionally, Brandon confirmed that the humans come from Ashyn, and even though Ashyn is... apocalyptic, it still exists, and has not been reduced to dust.

10 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

And Adolin says the Fused are Surgebinders:

Quote

Adolin turned as some Fused coursed through the sky along the distant wall. Enemy Surgebinders. Storms.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 799). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

Could be a case of unreliable narrator - it wouldn't be beyond Brandon to do so. That said, I'm not sold either way, I think both the "it's Surgebinding" and "it's Voidbinding" got good arguments and I don't think we can say anything for certain yet.

12 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

The Diagram named Dustbringers as their BFFs:

Quote

Adrotagia attempted to secure an emotional bond with this lesser Diagram member who had suddenly been thrust into its upper echelons, an event predicted by the Diagram—which explained that the Dustbringers would be the Radiants most likely to accept their cause.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (p. 566). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

I would argue this is an argument against Dustbringers destroying the world, as the Diagram - no matter what Mr T and others do in the name of it - is designed to save Roshar.

----

As for your point on the Recreance, you are actually contradicting yourself here, because on one hand you argue that the Radiants specifically targeted ashspren, but on the other hand you argue that they did not know what the dangerous powers were, and therefore they killed all their spren.

We also have a special "Voidbinding chart", which denotes 10 different powers, so it seems unlikely there is only one kind of Voidbinding.

Additionally, I find it weird that ashspren would so... well, dangerous, as, just like other spren, they've been made by Adonalsium and modified by Honor and Cultivation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dlyol said:

On the point about Dustbringers, the Part 3 epigraphs of Oathbringer did a great job of showing that at least historically they were not the sorts of violent, destructive people a lot of us assumed they were before Oathbringer. This doesn't strike me as misdirection on Brandon's part as the misdirection would be for the present era whereby due to the Recreance, the Ashspren have abandoned Honour which we knew about anyway. Every time we have seen Dustbringers historically, primarily one of Dalinar's visions where one fights a Thunderclast and in the aforementioned epigraphs they have been acting exactly as one would expect from a Knights Radiant. @Wit Beyond Measure I think perhaps you are overreading that one WOR epigraph a little bit much.

2

Thanks, Dlyol!  I didn't realize that the gems told which Order, but that makes so much sense. 

I don't think Dustbringers and Skybreakers are inherently evil - I have actually always loved Szeth, well before Oathbringer, so I'm thrilled to have him pledged to Dalinar - but I think they have the potential to be destroyers.  I see Dustbringing/Voidbringing as a weapon of mass destruction:  only as evil as the person who wields it but with tremendous potential to be evil. And so, when they do turn evil, they are insanely dangerous.  And if this theory was based on one epigraph, I would agree I was reading too much into it.  But there are three quotes linking void and dust specifically (historical WoR quote, the similar quote from Teshav in OB to Navini about Dustbringers and Voidbringers, and Dalinar's vision of the physical void left after the storm of dust).  And then there are tons of other quotes that point to the humans (specifically the Heralds and Radiants) being the true villains, not simply innocent bystanders who have fallen victim to Odium.

1 hour ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

I can't remember that. Where do we see it?

 

Lift's awesomeness (her Abrasion Surge) in her first interlude chapter in WoR is done by eating rather than by Stormlight.  She seems confused why the Skybreakers are moving the spheres far away from her because she never uses those.  Wit lightweaves in his stories but seems not to be a Herald nor a Radiant, though possibly on that path in the OB epilogue.

1 hour ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

As for your point on the Recreance, you are actually contradicting yourself here, because on one hand you argue that the Radiants specifically targeted ashspren, but on the other hand you argue that they did not know what the dangerous powers were, and therefore they killed all their spren.

9

Do I contradict myself?  "Very well then I contradict myself; (I am large, I contain multitudes.)"  Seriously, I don't know exactly how the Recreance went down.  Obviously.  I have said that I was only speculating that they didn't know the offending Order since Nale seems to be targeting all Orders.  On the other hand, the ashspren quote makes it seem like Honor was targeting ashspren specifically.  Perhaps both could be true at once in a way we cannot quite imagine yet.  Or perhaps both are misdirection.

1 hour ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

We also have a special "Voidbinding chart", which denotes 10 different powers, so it seems unlikely there is only one kind of Voidbinding.

9

Where is the Voidbinding chart?  I can only find one reference to "Voidbinding" in OB, in the Ars Arcanum after the Ten Essences chart:

Quote

I’m not certain yet how the ten levels of Voidbinding or its cousin the Old Magic fit into this paradigm, if indeed they can. My research suggests that, indeed, there should be another series of abilities that is even more esoteric than the Voidbindings.

Sanderson, Brandon. Oathbringer: Book Three of the Stormlight Archive (pp. 1237-1238). Tom Doherty Associates. Kindle Edition. 

1

I tend to think Voidbinding and Surgebinding are similar if not the same, just with different fuels.

1 hour ago, Ookla the Leyspren said:

Additionally, I find it weird that ashspren would so... well, dangerous, as, just like other spren, they've been made by Adonalsium and modified by Honor and Cultivation.

9

Dude, God is dangerous.  Seriously.  That's why we fear Him.  He is good, but dangerous.

Humans have made the assumption that spren are inherently good, that they cannot be evil, and therefore that they are the perfect check on the Surges.  But the Malata quote (and quotes from the Singers about the surges) makes me think that is an erroneous assumption.  Of course, all of that could be deliberate misdirection, too.

Edited by Wit Beyond Measure
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

Lift's awesomeness (her Abrasion Surge) in her first interlude chapter in WoR is done by eating rather than by Stormlight.  She seems confused why the Skybreakers are moving the spheres far away from her because she never uses those.  Wit lightweaves in his stories but seems not to be a Herald nor a Radiant, though possibly on that path in the OB epilogue.

Lift metabolizes food into Stormlight, this is explicitly mentioned in several occasions both in-universe and out-of-universe. In Oathbringer she is also explicitly mentioned to be glowing from Stormlight.

Wit is a special case, but we do know from Brandon that a form of Lightweaving existed on Yolen, so he was probably using that.

5 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

Where is the Voidbinding chart?  I can only find one reference to "Voidbinding" in OB, in the Ars Arcanum after the Ten Essences chart:

The chart is on this page: https://coppermind.net/wiki/Voidbinding It's also in some of the books, though not in the versions I've read.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Wit Beyond Measure said:

I don't think Dustbringers and Skybreakers are inherently evil - I have actually always loved Szeth, well before Oathbringer, so I'm thrilled to have him pledged to Dalinar - but I think they have the potential to be destroyers.  I see Dustbringing/Voidbringing as a weapon of mass destruction:  only as evil as the person who wields it but with tremendous potential to be evil. And so, when they do turn evil, they are insanely dangerous.  And if this theory was based on one epigraph, I would agree I was reading too much into it.  But there are three quotes linking void and dust specifically (historical WoR quote, the similar quote from Teshav in OB to Navini about Dustbringers and Voidbringers, and Dalinar's vision of the physical void left after the storm of dust).  And then there are tons of other quotes that point to the humans (specifically the Heralds and Radiants) being the true villains, not simply innocent bystanders who have fallen victim to Odium.

2

I don't dispute that Division has the potential to be extremely dangerous (in fact I have a slightly cracky theory that the Skybreakers shattered the Plains circa the time of the Recreance). My point is two-fold. We have lots of evidence that historically the Dustbringers weren't evil. Two that we have a fairly clear timeline of the early days of Roshar and we know the Radiants were founded well after the Humans had abandoned and the Singers had adopted Odium as their God.  

Said Timeline is: Humans arrive from Ashyn -> First Desolation (humans as Voidbringers) -> Singers anger attracts them to Odium, and visa versa, leading to the Fused and the Second Desolation (Singers as Voidbringers) -> The Oathpacts between Honour and the Heralds -> Spren begin to copy the powers of the Honourblades -> Inspired by Nohadon, Ishar forces the Surgebinders to form orders mediated by Oaths

In this timeline, it is fairly clear that the humans had become of Honour and the Singers of Odium long before the Radiants were formed so the Radiants and the Voidbringers were never the same thing. So, therefore, the Dustbringers cannot have been the Voidbringers although they now might side with them because of this timeline and the evidence we have that post-founding they were not of Odium. All of which is to say that I think the association of Dust and Void you detect is basically coincidental

Edited by Dlyol
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a lot of issues of perspective with what people say in Stormlight.  Adolin calls what the Fused do Surgebinding because that's all he knows.  It looks like Surgebinding so that's what it is to him.  That does mean the Fused are Surgebinders.

The translated Dawnchant says that Humans destroyed their old world with Surgebinding.  Again, that's what they know.  Doesn't confirm that Surgebinding exists outside of Roshar.  They also state that Humans worshipped/brought Odium.  That doesn't mean the Humans willingly.  Perspective is important.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Edgedancers are pure cultivation spern.  That's why she eats food.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Raventhal said:

I think Edgedancers are pure cultivation spern.  That's why she eats food.

Except that Wyndle is surprised that Lift can do this implying this isn't something other Edgedancers can do. I don't know if we have a WOB saying this in so many words but I think what is broadly surmised as having happened is that Lift went to the Nightwatcher to ask not to age ever, Nightwatcher didn't know how to do this so instead moved her slightly into the cognitive realm. This is why she can metabolise food into Stormlight and also why she was able to enter Dalinar's visions and can see Szeth's afterimages

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to bring up the fact that the magic that destroyed Ashyn is not Surgebinding, but it uses the same principles (Surges).

Also, Brandon has said that Voidbinding doesn't have a one-to-one relationship with Surgebinding, so I find it highly unlikely that the Fused are using Voidbinding since their Surges are effectively the same as the normal Surges. 

Edited by Ookla the StrooklaEZ
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.