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Question

So I know that realmatic theory has its inspiration in Plato's Phaedrus but I am really interested in the inspiration behind the interpenetration of the cognitive and the physical realms. For example: 

Spoiler

stormlight heals Lopen's missing arm but Kaladin's scars remain (presumably because of how the wounds of each are connected to their self-perception). This is all really interesting for Lift as well, who might be permanently 10 years old because of her self-perception (or maybe that was just the Nightwatcher's gift).

Does anyone know where Brandon might have gotten inspiration for the idea that perception affects the structures of reality? It seems so similar to something you'd read in Michel Foucault's work on the gaze and how perception is reality-producing. I looked up "Brandon Sanderson and postmodernism" but the only thing that came up was something Brandon posted about deconstructing the fantasy genre. 

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3 answers to this question

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I'll point out that Edgedancer did show that Lift is unaging. Furthermore, it seems like healing and regeneration cannot prevent aging, as they use the soul as a template and the soul knows how old you should be. Other methods are required to fool that.

Regarding the main question, here's the closest I could find.

Quote

NEPENE ()

You've mentioned several philosophical concepts used in the writing of your books, like Jung's collective unconsciousness, Plato's cave. Could you expand a bit on your use of those in your books, and whether you think it is necessary to use philosophy to make a good fantasy world?

BRANDON SANDERSON

I don't think it's necessary at all. The writer's own fascinations—whatever they are—can add to the writing experience. But yes, some philosophical ideas worked into my fiction. Plato's theory of the forms has always fascinated, and so the idea of a physical/cognitive/spiritual realm is certainly a product of this. Human perception of ideals has a lot to do with the cognitive realm, and a true ideal has a lot to do with the spiritual realm.

As for more examples, they're spread through my fiction. Spinoza is in there a lot, and Jung has a lot to do with the idea of spiritual connectivity (and how the Parshendi can all sing the same songs.)

NEPENE

Not completely sure where Spinoza comes in. I guess the shards are part of the natural world and have no personality without a human wielder.

BRANDON SANDERSON

Yes on Spinoza there, and also the idea of God being in everything, and everything of one substance. Unifying laws. Those sorts of things. (Less his determinism, though.)

[Source]

 

Edited by Spoolofwhool
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This is an interesting question, especially after seeing how things behave in the cognitive realm. I understand what you're saying, but I don't understand how to answer this question, or what I would say. Sorry. It's a cool idea tho

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