Quadrophenia

Crazy Roleplaying Stories!

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Oh, hey! Who wants to see the recaps of my Disney's Dungeons and Dragons campaign? I've posted them on my deviantart account.

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1 hour ago, Quadrophenia said:

Oh, hey! Who wants to see the recaps of my Disney's Dungeons and Dragons campaign? I've posted them on my deviantart account.

Me, me!

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22 hours ago, Quadrophenia said:

I'm going to have fun reading this for the next few days. :ph34r:

(Incidentally... if you like fairy tales, I'd recommend checking out Snow White, by AAW publishing. It's a module published for Pathfidner and D&D based around... well, Snow White. Very closely based around it, but there's a lot of fun looking stuff in it.)

And... FYI. Double-posting is generally frowned upon? Sorry; should have mentioned that before, but just... for future reference.

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14 minutes ago, Quiver said:

I'm going to have fun reading this for the next few days. :ph34r:

(Incidentally... if you like fairy tales, I'd recommend checking out Snow White, by AAW publishing. It's a module published for Pathfidner and D&D based around... well, Snow White. Very closely based around it, but there's a lot of fun looking stuff in it.)

And... FYI. Double-posting is generally frowned upon? Sorry; should have mentioned that before, but just... for future reference.

Have to say, I haven't heard of this module.

And when have I double-posted? Unless you count first linking the above to you in a private message as the first post?

Edited by Quadrophenia
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Just now, Quadrophenia said:

Have to say, I haven't heard of this module.

Ask and thou shalt recieve

(One of the few RPing stuff I own, along with Rise of the Drow, so...)

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1 minute ago, Quiver said:

Ask and thou shalt recieve

(One of the few RPing stuff I own, along with Rise of the Drow, so...)

... Ah, damnation. If I had known about this, it would have saved me so much time on the map brewing, enemy brewing... 

I feel like a right git now.

Edited by Quadrophenia
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Just now, Quadrophenia said:

... Ah, damnation. If I had known about this, it would have saved me so much time on the map brewing, enemy brewing... 

I feel like a right git now.

I haven't read your stuff yet, but it does play the Snow White fairy tale rather straight; homebrewed stuff would probably be a tad more exciting or interesting . Though on the other hand, Morsain is kind of insane and fantastic; every store in the GM book is themed around a different fairy tale character or concept, so that's fairly neat.

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39 minutes ago, Quiver said:

I haven't read your stuff yet, but it does play the Snow White fairy tale rather straight; homebrewed stuff would probably be a tad more exciting or interesting . Though on the other hand, Morsain is kind of insane and fantastic; every store in the GM book is themed around a different fairy tale character or concept, so that's fairly neat.

You know, I read that as "fairy neat" for a moment there, heh heh!

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A couple of years ago (January 2012, I believe it was), I was spending the last couple of weeks of my Christmas break from college with my two brothers, who were at a different college a half-hour away from mine. Our schedules weren't in-sync, so their classes had started up and all their friends were back, and one of those weekends we did an RPG session. No extended campaign or consistent storyline, just an all-day adventure with one-shot characters that my brother had written. We used the Wizards of the Coast Star Wars RPG (Saga Edition), which we had played extensively in high school, so I knew how to stat up a character very well.

Now, I had met most the people I was playing with before, but didn't know them all that well - they were my brothers' friends. As we were rolling up characters, I got the sense that we weren't taking this terribly seriously - goofy backstories, no constant immersion, looking for some laughs. So, I build myself the perfect character. Min-maxed like crazy. Wookiee, for the Strength bonus. We all got to start at level 8, so I knew exactly where I wanted to end up and chose the perfect feats/talents for armor usage and martial arts. Sunk all my starting credits into the most expensive strength-augmented armor I could afford, with just enough left over for a broken translator unit. And then, I cleared my throat in preparation, and the other players were introduced to... Arnold Schwartzenbacca, the greatest Wookiee Soldier the galaxy had ever seen.

Needless to say, he was a hit, and was instantly voted in as leader of the party, so I got to perform all of our interactions with NPCs in my bad-Arnold-impression voice. Everyone found ways to chip in, offering references to classic Arnold movie lines. Every combat centered around me wading through blaster fire unharmed up to the enemies (heavy armor reduced my walking speed, so it took a little while), and then ending them in one punch with an appropriate quip while everyone else kept them from escaping. I don't recall too many specifics (which is probably for the best), but my brother who was GMing was getting humorously frustrated by how much I had stolen the show. (The other brother was, of course, egging me on to no end.)

One thing led to another, the party gets split, and there we are: Arnold and one other character, in the engine room of an Imperial Star Destroyer as I literally punch the engines apart. The GM looks expectantly at my partner. If I finish off these engines, the mission is a success - but if I somehow fail, all is lost. A squad of stormtroopers comes in behind me, and my partner opens fire on them, letting me finish the mission. Obvious move, right... but as the GM fumed, we (the players) learned was that the other player had been recruited by my brother beforehand to play a mole. He was an Imperial the whole time, waiting for his moment to sabotage the mission. But, as we adventured together, he had a change of heart. He couldn't betray the Wookienator. So, when the GM gave the player the signal to turn sides, he ignored it, and we handily polished off the Star Destroyer and completed the mission.

My brother hasn't forgiven me to this day for 'ruining' his mission. Whenever he invites me to join his RPG group anymore, he has but one condition: No Arnold Schwartzenbacca.

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43 minutes ago, Pagerunner said:

A couple of years ago (January 2012, I believe it was), I was spending the last couple of weeks of my Christmas break from college with my two brothers, who were at a different college a half-hour away from mine. Our schedules weren't in-sync, so their classes had started up and all their friends were back, and one of those weekends we did an RPG session. No extended campaign or consistent storyline, just an all-day adventure with one-shot characters that my brother had written. We used the Wizards of the Coast Star Wars RPG (Saga Edition), which we had played extensively in high school, so I knew how to stat up a character very well.

Now, I had met most the people I was playing with before, but didn't know them all that well - they were my brothers' friends. As we were rolling up characters, I got the sense that we weren't taking this terribly seriously - goofy backstories, no constant immersion, looking for some laughs. So, I build myself the perfect character. Min-maxed like crazy. Wookiee, for the Strength bonus. We all got to start at level 8, so I knew exactly where I wanted to end up and chose the perfect feats/talents for armor usage and martial arts. Sunk all my starting credits into the most expensive strength-augmented armor I could afford, with just enough left over for a broken translator unit. And then, I cleared my throat in preparation, and the other players were introduced to... Arnold Schwartzenbacca, the greatest Wookiee Soldier the galaxy had ever seen.

Needless to say, he was a hit, and was instantly voted in as leader of the party, so I got to perform all of our interactions with NPCs in my bad-Arnold-impression voice. Everyone found ways to chip in, offering references to classic Arnold movie lines. Every combat centered around me wading through blaster fire unharmed up to the enemies (heavy armor reduced my walking speed, so it took a little while), and then ending them in one punch with an appropriate quip while everyone else kept them from escaping. I don't recall too many specifics (which is probably for the best), but my brother who was GMing was getting humorously frustrated by how much I had stolen the show. (The other brother was, of course, egging me on to no end.)

One thing led to another, the party gets split, and there we are: Arnold and one other character, in the engine room of an Imperial Star Destroyer as I literally punch the engines apart. The GM looks expectantly at my partner. If I finish off these engines, the mission is a success - but if I somehow fail, all is lost. A squad of stormtroopers comes in behind me, and my partner opens fire on them, letting me finish the mission. Obvious move, right... but as the GM fumed, we (the players) learned was that the other player had been recruited by my brother beforehand to play a mole. He was an Imperial the whole time, waiting for his moment to sabotage the mission. But, as we adventured together, he had a change of heart. He couldn't betray the Wookienator. So, when the GM gave the player the signal to turn sides, he ignored it, and we handily polished off the Star Destroyer and completed the mission.

My brother hasn't forgiven me to this day for 'ruining' his mission. Whenever he invites me to join his RPG group anymore, he has but one condition: No Arnold Schwartzenbacca.

... Arnold Schwartzenbacca is my hero. 

I salute you, sir!

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I wasn't at the top of my game for running D&D tonight, not bad, but I can do better. It went well anyway so I'm not complaining :)

Where we left off last time they had just distracted the werewolves and started making a run for it (deciding to leave the important crystal thing behind). I had a cool skill challenge prepared for trying to outrun the werewolves, and a fight prepared if they failed but none of that happened. The druid, having just rejoined the party, cast summon animal and summoned horses for them all to ride on and away they went. I did make them roll animal handling checks to stay on the horses backs as they were moving rather fast without saddles (or necessarily that much experience riding) but only the druid failed and he succeeded soon enough to not get caught by the werewolves. So that went rather quicker than I had expected :P Excellent use of that spell.

Fortunately I have the zone pretty well prepared so I wasn't caught unprepared or anything. After exploring some more they ended up planting one of the magic beans from the "bag of beans" the druid got a while back. I have very much been looking forward to them doing so. I rolled percentile dice but truthfully I'd already decided what would happen this time. A vine grew into an archway that opened a temporary portal to a small tunnel/hut like thing made from a grove of trees. Inside was a feline humanoid who had the special ability to answer 3 questions about the past, present or future. With the following caveats:

-All 3 questions must be asked before any answers are given

-2 answers will be true, 1 will be false

A couple of party members arrived late just as the others finalised the questions they wanted to ask and so they didn't feel left out I decided, what the heck, they can ask their own set of questions. So everyone enjoyed coming up with questions and then trying to guess which of the cryptic answers was true and which were false.

After that they had an encounter with a group of "wild fey", who are the progenitors of all other elves in my world. They offered to help the PCs to bypass a certain barrier (this wasn't the only way they could pass the barrier) if, in return, one of the PCs agreed to become a wild fey. They hinted at changes that were coming to the world and that the PCs were already involved in them (true) and stated that they wished to have more influence outside of their place in the feywild to ensure that when the world did change, they would still have a place in it (also true). After a number of discussions about the changes that would incur one of the player's decided to take the offer. I think becoming immortal was a fairly strong selling point.

So while the rest of the PCs went to get dinner we had a 15 minute one on one session to rp through the process and deal with all the adjustments to their character. Some of which went onto their character sheet, some of which didn't. Can't have the other players knowing some things until that player chooses to tell them :D

The only mental change involved is that the character now considers the wild fey's goal of ensuring their place in the world remains as rather important. The physical changes replace their old racial bonuses, but with significantly more powerful ones. Though they may want to keep the extent of these changes hidden from the other PCs, they might get a little nervous if they realise quite how much she's changed ;)

Across all of this the PCs learned quite a bit about this arc and a bit about the campaign/world as a whole.

We closed off with a combat that achieved one of the objectives they needed and also, being against plant creatures, was an excellent opportunity for some of their PCs to enjoy their fire based magic items and another to enjoy an axe that deals max damage against plant creatures. He got it approaching a year ago and we hadn't fought plant creatures since :P

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On 2016-11-11 at 9:18 AM, Claincy said:

I wasn't at the top of my game for running D&D tonight, not bad, but I can do better. It went well anyway so I'm not complaining :)

Where we left off last time they had just distracted the werewolves and started making a run for it (deciding to leave the important crystal thing behind). I had a cool skill challenge prepared for trying to outrun the werewolves, and a fight prepared if they failed but none of that happened. The druid, having just rejoined the party, cast summon animal and summoned horses for them all to ride on and away they went. I did make them roll animal handling checks to stay on the horses backs as they were moving rather fast without saddles (or necessarily that much experience riding) but only the druid failed and he succeeded soon enough to not get caught by the werewolves. So that went rather quicker than I had expected :P Excellent use of that spell.

Fortunately I have the zone pretty well prepared so I wasn't caught unprepared or anything. After exploring some more they ended up planting one of the magic beans from the "bag of beans" the druid got a while back. I have very much been looking forward to them doing so. I rolled percentile dice but truthfully I'd already decided what would happen this time. A vine grew into an archway that opened a temporary portal to a small tunnel/hut like thing made from a grove of trees. Inside was a feline humanoid who had the special ability to answer 3 questions about the past, present or future. With the following caveats:

-All 3 questions must be asked before any answers are given

-2 answers will be true, 1 will be false

A couple of party members arrived late just as the others finalised the questions they wanted to ask and so they didn't feel left out I decided, what the heck, they can ask their own set of questions. So everyone enjoyed coming up with questions and then trying to guess which of the cryptic answers was true and which were false.

After that they had an encounter with a group of "wild fey", who are the progenitors of all other elves in my world. They offered to help the PCs to bypass a certain barrier (this wasn't the only way they could pass the barrier) if, in return, one of the PCs agreed to become a wild fey. They hinted at changes that were coming to the world and that the PCs were already involved in them (true) and stated that they wished to have more influence outside of their place in the feywild to ensure that when the world did change, they would still have a place in it (also true). After a number of discussions about the changes that would incur one of the player's decided to take the offer. I think becoming immortal was a fairly strong selling point.

So while the rest of the PCs went to get dinner we had a 15 minute one on one session to rp through the process and deal with all the adjustments to their character. Some of which went onto their character sheet, some of which didn't. Can't have the other players knowing some things until that player chooses to tell them :D

The only mental change involved is that the character now considers the wild fey's goal of ensuring their place in the world remains as rather important. The physical changes replace their old racial bonuses, but with significantly more powerful ones. Though they may want to keep the extent of these changes hidden from the other PCs, they might get a little nervous if they realise quite how much she's changed ;)

Across all of this the PCs learned quite a bit about this arc and a bit about the campaign/world as a whole.

We closed off with a combat that achieved one of the objectives they needed and also, being against plant creatures, was an excellent opportunity for some of their PCs to enjoy their fire based magic items and another to enjoy an axe that deals max damage against plant creatures. He got it approaching a year ago and we hadn't fought plant creatures since :P

By God, your stories are wonderful.

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3 hours ago, Quadrophenia said:

By God, your stories are wonderful.

:D

Course the advantage of retelling stories in a format like this is you miss all the times we lost momentum or something fell flat :P

General question: What's your setup like when GMing? I'd say behind the GM screen but not everyone uses one :P

When running mistborn I have:

-my laptop in front/slightly to the side of me with my notes and digital copies of the rulebook

-my (rather large) pile of mistborn dice

-my stack of MAG books

-loose paper for quickly sketching maps

-sometimes a large map of Luthadel with pins for the house war or other handouts

 

When running D&D I have a bit more:

-my laptop with my notes (google drive), useful websites like kobold fight club and donjon and assorted potentially useful pdfs ready to use. This sits off to my right slightly.

-next to that I have a whole pile of dice

-down to my left I keep my stack of core rulebooks

-on the floor to my right I have a little box filled with campaign coins (the most recent addition)

-next to that I have a box with the minis I think might be useful and cards for magic items the party may get (I use this template to make them)

-in my bag I have spare paper and assorted terrain that might come in handy. The specific terrain varies depending on the session but usually includes a selection of Terra Tiles, Dungeon Explore tile card deck & sometimes a selection of dwarven forge and other pieces. The dwarven forge gets pretty heavy though so I only take large amounts for big set piece encounters. I tend to run theatre of the mind for simple encounters and a mixture of 2D/3D terrain for more complicated encounters.

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4 hours ago, Claincy said:

General question: What's your setup like when GMing? I'd say behind the GM screen but not everyone uses one :P

Here's my setup for when I GM Star Wars: Edge of the Empire. Prepare for a monologue!

First off, we set pretty much everything up on a long table. The GM gets the head of the table, a player gets the other head, and 2 can sit on each side on wooden benches. Each of the players use folders to keep their stuff together (when I'm a player, mine has a character sheet, talent and signature ability trees, a copy of my backstory, and a basic index of actions, maneuvers, and check difficulties). At the head of the table, I put up the GM screen to use for reference and to hide my notes. As a GM I don't use technology most of the time; but instead have a packet for possible storylines (I account for multiple paths to success), a sheet full of NPC stat lines that I've crafted for the adventure, and maps of locales I think the PCs will visit. On the wall is a whiteboard, and that's where the real gameplay happens. Each PC has their own icon with magnet, and so the players can move their icons wherever they wish their character to go. There are also magnetic icons for NPCs so they can get in on the fun of movement and cover. Next to the NPC icons are written any necessary notes showing stats like remaining HP, speed, and number of enemies if they're in groups. When the players move to a new location, the board is erased and a new rough map of what the PCs can see is drawn on the board. The whiteboard has an entire left side devoted to gameplay variables: there are spots for initiative order, time of day, and extra spots for any other ongoing notes that I need to make. Usually one of the more-experienced players (I tend to do this if I'm not GM-ing) will act as secretary to do things like running initiative and moving icons at the order of the GM. While the diagramming of movement and combat happens on the whiteboard on the wall, the mechanics are carried out at the table. In the center of the table are the piles of dice. They are in the middle so all players can roll checks at my whim; if I need to roll a check for an NPC I'll just ask one of the players to roll it for me; or in the case of a secret check I'll walk around, grab what I need, and roll them behind the GM screen. Also in the middle are any extra gameplay items: maps that the PCs have collected, Destiny Points, trackers for wounds and strain; everything that the players need access to. If a rules question is brought up, the bookcase behind the GM side of the table holds pretty much every rulebook made for the game, ever. The problem is finding out which one has the stats for the blaster you want to buy. :P

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@Claincy Depends. 

When DM/GM-ing in person, I have my screen and several stacks of corebooks from different games to round it off as one great castle so that the players would "really" have to crane their necks over to see whatever it was I was doing. Generally, there's also a buffet of Indian takeout between all of us (and quite a few beers). 

Via text chats, I have my dice in reality and several tabbed character sheets in one window and a special window devoted to the main story of my game. Which, incidentally, is being rewritten all the time since, well, it's tabletop gaming. The players can't be expected to follow a script 1:1, so hence I must be flexible.

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I have a quasi role playing thing I'm doing in shadowrun hong kong.  Its more of a character choice then anything.  But it does contain spoilers for the game.  Just be warned.

Spoiler

I'm playing a mage/summoner (more mage, who can summon some things when sommon spots are in the area).  Now I'm refusing to say my dad is dead.  If there is ever a conversation option for that, I always choose the one that gives the option he's alive.

And second, I'm refusing to call Cheng, auntie.  If there is a dialog option that doesn't call her auntie anything, I always choose that one.  Regardless of what it might do to her opinion of me.  Why?  Because I'm not from Hong Kong.  I might be here for now, and I might stay.  But I'm an outsider, an American.  So I don't bow to anyone.  I respect them, I look them in the eye, and I'm helpful.  But I don't bow to them.

All that said, I'm not being a dick to folks either.  If I can help them, I take that option.  So long as it doesn't make me bow to their wishes, or give into their demands.

I've also beaten the game as a decker who's good with an assault rifle.  So I know whats coming, and am trying to prepare for that with my dialog options.  As best as I can ofc.

Just something interesting I'm going in an 2.5D rpg.

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A while ago with my old RPG group (now sadly defunct) we were playing this system that was based off of conspiracies and secrets. It was extremely flexible about its settings, so we decided to set it in a massive crossover of everything Disney.

We then decided that everyone had to choose an existing character from the Disneycanon.

Specifically a Disney princess.

Keep in mind that we were a bunch of dudes (and one girl) ranging in age from 15 to 26...and everyone was a Disney princess.

I was Merida because SCOTLAND. Unfortunately though, I wasn't able to bust out my Scottish accent because we were playing in Hebrew. :( We also had a Snow White (complete with a dinky, high-pitched voice and mandatory vegetarianism in her kingdom), Tinkerbell (sassy and with very random and potentially deadly magic. We turned into fish once), Venelope von Schweetz from Wreck it Ralph (hyperactive and insane), Mulan (actually pretty quiet and tame. And the only one actually played by a girl) and Elsa (the mom of the group and perpetually face-palming at our antics. Also a pretty good strategist).

We didn't finish the entire storyline, but it was fun while it lasted.

Edit- I also got poisoned at least two, maybe three, times. I think the GM was trying to tell me something.

Also we met a middle-aged, washed up Peter Pan and the Genie was the innkeeper in the classic tavern scene at the beginning of the game (and we got into a tavern brawl with Captain Hook).

Edited by Pinnacle-Ferring
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10 hours ago, Pinnacle-Ferring said:

A while ago with my old RPG group (now sadly defunct) we were playing this system that was based off of conspiracies and secrets. It was extremely flexible about its settings, so we decided to set it in a massive crossover of everything Disney.

We then decided that everyone had to choose an existing character from the Disneycanon.

Specifically a Disney princess.

Keep in mind that we were a bunch of dudes (and one girl) ranging in age from 15 to 26...and everyone was a Disney princess.

I was Merida because SCOTLAND. Unfortunately though, I wasn't able to bust out my Scottish accent because we were playing in Hebrew. :( We also had a Snow White (complete with a dinky, high-pitched voice and mandatory vegetarianism in her kingdom), Tinkerbell (sassy and with very random and potentially deadly magic. We turned into fish once), Venelope von Schweetz from Wreck it Ralph (hyperactive and insane), Mulan (actually pretty quiet and tame. And the only one actually played by a girl) and Elsa (the mom of the group and perpetually face-palming at our antics. Also a pretty good strategist).

We didn't finish the entire storyline, but it was fun while it lasted.

Edit- I also got poisoned at least two, maybe three, times. I think the GM was trying to tell me something.

Also we met a middle-aged, washed up Peter Pan and the Genie was the innkeeper in the classic tavern scene at the beginning of the game (and we got into a tavern brawl with Captain Hook).

Ha! It's like an absurd comedy version of the campaign my friends and I are running!

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2 hours ago, Quadrophenia said:

Ha! It's like an absurd comedy version of the campaign my friends and I are running!

To be fair, while the background stuff could be pretty whimsical, the main plot was pretty serious and even creepy at times.

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1 hour ago, Pinnacle-Ferring said:

To be fair, while the background stuff could be pretty whimsical, the main plot was pretty serious and even creepy at times.

Just like our's! So far, in our story, most of the classic Disney heroes are dead, Maleficent rules the world, Jafar broke off from the bad guy faction to start his own Empire, Hades is conspiring to overthrow both, and in the first story arc my Rogue disguises herself as Snow White so she can assassinate the Evil Queen up close and personal.

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I find it humorous just how fickle the dice can be. Take this case study from today's D&D campaign:

(for reference, this is D&D 5th and I'm playing a level 3 (very low level) Rogue)

Scenario 1: Dice of Odium

So we're walking along the trail and run into a stray patrol of hobgoblins. And I mean these guys were pretty pathetic, and there were only 4 of them against 4 of us. We split into four 1v1 battles and get fighting. I flop my initiative (rather hard to do with +5 against +0, but I did it) and my hobgoblin attacks and misses because I'm really hard to hit. And then I attack and roll a 2. My hobgoblin attacks again. Miss. I attack again. 5. Nope. My hobgoblin attacks again. Miss. I attack again: 3. And then the other characters had all finished and so took pity and killed my hobgoblin for me. I hadn't dealt a single point of damage to that weakling.

Scenario 2: Dice of Honor

We're down in the adventure a little ways, and an old hermit offers to give us some info about the location of hidden treasures in exchange for a favor. Said favor was driving off a young green dragon from the ruined house across the way. And the four of us, with a total level between us of 14, were greedy enough to take this guy up on his offer even though it was foolhardy. We walk over there, the dragon isn't in a talking mood, and the battle starts. And we just couldn't miss. Over the 3 turns that I dealt 0 damage to that one hobgoblin, I dealt about 45 damage to this dragon; about half of its total HP, all with a light crossbow and a rapier. The dragon, despite making 3 attacks per turn, hit one of our party only once over the course of the fight, and that was the Fighter with the most HP of us all. Eventually, the dragon just gave up, flew away, and left us with the loot.

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Not my story, but one relayed via a youtube channel I follow which I found entertaining.

So this guy decided to run a DnD 5th edition game, and he decided to play it as a spoof of Lord of the Rings. The concept was that the party was going to have the mystical anklet of the Dark Lord Archaeopteryx, and had to take it to the far end of the world to sell it to an inter dimensional pawn shop. 

As part of that, he made up his version of the Silmarillion mythology, which I found entertaining, which is what I'm talking about now.

So, his concept was that, at the beginning of time, the great God Particularis was the conductor of the orchestra that sung the world into creation. The Great Evil was a god called Widfa.

As I say, it's based on the Silmarillion. If you aren't familiar with it, the concept for the Silmarillion mythology is that the God of the LotR verse (Eru) gathered the Valar and had them sing the world into creation. During the song, one of the Valar, Melkor, made changes and tried to do his own thing, causing a lot of discord and strife in the choir. Melkor went on to become the OG Dark Lord, and Sauron's boss, Morgoth.

Widfa had a... slightly different motive.
He got lost.

The orchestra was singing off of a score sheet meant to summon all of creation into being. With that in mind, it was quite long; infinite, in fact. Which made it really bad when Widfa lost his place.
Suddenly, he had no idea where the rest of the group was, what page they were supposed to be on, or what he was supposed to be playing. A bad situation to begin with, but he also happened to be playing an important instrument. So he started trying to fake it, by pretending to play.

...Except, that doesn't exactly fly when your boss is the All-Knowing God, so Particularis kept honing in on Widfa and telling him to start playing louder. At which point Widfa just starts playing random notes, hoping that maybe he's at the right place with the rest of the group, and he never is.

According to the DM, Widfa's bad music is the cause for discord and disharmony in the world, and eventually, it gets so bad that Particularis banishes Widfa from his chair and makes him sit in the back to play the triangle... and Widfa still can't do that right, so every now and again, small disturbances and unrest in the world happen because Widfa doesn't know when to chime in properly. 

I found the idea entertaining.

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So today was interesting. I was running a session of Mistborn for one of the crews. This particular crew is currently involved in a house war and I'm largely letting them decide their own strategy and just rolling with it (I did give them some information and a cool map of Luthadel to strategise with). But here's what made today particularly interesting to handle: this crew was about 2 or 3 days behind another crew in the timeline. 2 sessions ago that other crew was at a ball which I figured (correctly) that this crew would get to in today's session. The thing is, as far as the first crew was aware nothing particularly untoward happened at the ball, it didn't get violent and nobody got killed. That's great and all, but when you have a second crew with a proclivity for killing going through the same event.....the established canon is in peril.

I did make sure a warning came up that if they broke the peace at this ball it might significantly hurt their chances of forging alliances with other houses that were currently neutral in the house war (still about 2/3rds of the major houses at this point) and I had some thoughts as to how to handle it if it did happen. In essence so long as it was hidden or covered up for long enough that the other crew wouldn't have found out about it yet where they are up to, it's all good.

As it turned out, one of the PCs did murder someone but they had the sense to do it quickly and quietly (in the men's toiletry area) and to hide the body, so the timeline stays (practically) intact! What they don't know is that an important NPC who is allied with them noticed the PC who did it standing in that area and will doubtless put 2 and 2 together (this happened by chance, not a plan on my part). What makes things even more interesting is that they selected their target fairly randomly based on who happened to give them the opportunity (making sure they were from an opposed house of course) and I just used a random number generator to select which house the next NPC to come along would be in each instance and then I just picked an existing NPC from that house or made one up. Now it turns out that that random(ish) NPC he murdered happens to be married to a PC from the other crew's sister. All in all the consequences of today's session should be very interesting.

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