Ripheus23

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Ripheus23 last won the day on November 21 2018

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About Ripheus23

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  • Birthday 07/15/1986

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  1. Scadrial: "Ash fell from the sky." Roshar: "Rain fell from the sky." Nalthis: "Colors fell from the sky." Sel: "Symbols fell from the sky." Threnody: "Ghosts fell from the sky." Taldain: "Sand fell from the sky." Sixth of the Dusk world: "Birds fell from the sky." ... the whole Cosmere: "Shards fell from the sky."
  2. I forgot to mention that my theory sort of depends on a strong analogy between the Everstorm and the highstorms, i.e. the reason the Everstorm now exists is due to its containment of the Cognitive Shadow of the Child (since this being died during/after Aharietiam) in a way like unto how the highstorms contain the Stormfather-as-the-Shadow-of-Honor.
  3. THEORY: Honor and Cultivation had a literal child, who though not a Shard was still immensely powerful. The Cognitive Shadow of Tanavast, in the Stormfather, is reliving Honor's having of a son by "adopting" Kaladin in relation to Sylphrena, the Ancient Daughter. But long ago, the dishardic Child bonded a spren, too. This became, therefore, the Sibling. Somehow Kaladin and Sylphrena will prove relevant to the awakening of the Sibling, who went to sleep after the Child was killed at Aharietiam. It was this death that pushed Tanavast into the spiral of raving before his own death. This was the being who Odium said "you!" to at the Battle of Thaylen Field. Dalinar, via the boon of Cultivation and the Stormfather of Honor, is channeling the Cognitive Shadow of the Child. Indeed, the ghost of the Child is the one responsible for the dream-anomaly involving the image of Nohadon. [I think Nohadon was related to the Child historically, too, though how I have no theory about.] The process by which Odium assailed the Child produced the Unmade. I.e. Odium ripped off pieces of his own soul and slammed them into the Child; the different forms of torture drew in spren corresponding to certain emotional patterns and this, combined with the Child's special powers, merged the power of those spren with the Splinters of Odium, forming the Unmade. After all the Unmade were born, Odium managed to combine with them to kill the Child and this is why he said, "We killed you!"
  4. McQuisitors: "Can I get Spikes with that?" "I said no blood on my bloodburger." "Oooh, I want to try the new Crispy McEntrails!" "Um, extra eyeballs. Just put them in a box on the side." "That'll be 1.08 atiums, please." "I thought it was just 99 electrums?"
  5. Apocalypse plot-twist: a Nalthian on Ashyn becomes a Drab so he can get immune-deficient enough to cultivate an exotic microbe that has the power to defeat Odiautombitruin.* EDIT: Odiautombitruinominion.
  6. A Labyrinth of Crystallized Light

    The scientist did not remember the Low Yield Exchange (also known as the Low Yield Exchange Incident) because she had not been born yet, then. Later, as an adult, she'd come to think about how the philosophy of chaos told her that she would not have been born at all, but for the meeting of the exact same parents as she had, at the exact same time, anyway. Evolution had been kidnapped by extinction, was being dragged towards the monster's layer; this scientist owed the darkness her very life nevertheless.

    ... [As it turned out, the use of the "mutually-assured-destruction doctrine" to hold back the end of days worked due to the absolute-proof theorem. However, the spider between the lines spun a web of lies that inspired the nuclear militaries of the Earth to develop an enormous number of "low-yield explosives," meaning in the 0.1KT to 10KT equivalence range. Yet so many were manufactured and used that the death toll during the LYEI still amounted to an unprecedented statistic of democide. Here are hypothetical examples of the unconventionally large number of fatalities (from single/limited-number bombing runs in an urban area) during the LYEI:

    Seattle: 29,000

    Omaha: 35,000

    Washington, D.C.: 112,000

    Tel Aviv: 123,000* [ironically, Jerusalem is not bombed because it is not recognized by Iran as the capital of Israel]

    Tehran: 442,000

    Beijing: 1,094,000

    Tokyo [don't ask me why/how]: 3,000,000 [assumed]

    Delhi: 75,000

    Islamabad: 157,000

    London: 76,000

    Paris: 43,000

    Norfolk: 44,000

    Pyongyang: 655,000

    TOTAL: 5,885,000

    The LeMay limit: "theoretical" psychological limit on ordnance expenditure by a given world superpower, over a certain interval. The number is assumed to be around 2 to 3 million (depending on the government in question) and is named in "honor" of Curtis LeMay, the butcher of Japan and Korea. The idea is that the US, for instance, will not use much more energy during a LYE as was used by all factions together during the Second World War. Nevertheless, this "allowed" the US to fire off nearly 3,000,000 tons' worth of low-yield explosives, during the LYEI. (Indeed, it was later discovered that during Operation "Watchmen" a number of political elites had agreed to "grant permission" to each other to use certain quantities of low-yield devices, to kill select numbers of foreign civilians, in order to "demonstrate" the threat of nuclear holocaust sufficiently intensely so that the next generation of political elites would guard against the full-scale form of this threat, i.e. by reaffirming the doctrine of MAD. Unfortunately, the propensity of such a demonstration, to achieve its purpose, was tempered by the widespread apathy expressed about the number of civilians killed during the LYEI, i.e. since it was "too low" ("lower than World War 2," one commentator notes), especially in relation to the global population (7ish billion), it didn't instill enough new dread in enough people, to hold back the future danger of the LYL theory [low-yield lattice theory]...)

    1. Ripheus23

      Ripheus23

      Rename: Operation "Watchmen" is now Operation "Ozymandias" AKA "the Ooze." One of the main characters believes this is a reference to chemical weapons before the LYE commences.

  7. When Shards Collide by Immanuel Velitovsky(sp.?)?
  8. http://dc.medill.northwestern.edu/blog/2018/02/09/exactly-low-yield-nuclear-weapon/#sthash.I1biKEhs.dpbs

    So, it occurred to me, a while after hearing the president of the US (where I live) propose his idea of developing low-yield nuclear weapons systems or whatever, that my special knowledge of the Vietnam War and high-yield nuclear weapons test reports indicates what this proposal would amount to. So, according to Nick Turse's book about the Vietnam War, in 1969 alone the US military placed an order for 379,000,000 incendiary grenades (white phosphorous in particular, IIRC).

    I don't know what that means (was the order to be filled in the same year? over the next few years? in general?). I do know that the US military used an immense amount of firepower during this specific war. Like 17,000,000 tons of explosive force, 370,000+ tons of napalm, compared to a little over 2,000,000 as were used by every major faction during the Second World War, including only 200,000 tons (~150,000 conventional, ~10,000 napalm, ~33,000 nuclear, I think...) on Japan's cities.

    Which, you know, well, I won't make a gallows-humor remark but I will tell you that the USSBS (Strategic Bombing Survey) claimed it would only take 500 tons of bombs to devastate the average city. If low-yield nuclear weapons can range from 1,000 tons to even 10,000 tons, of TNT-equivalent explosive force (along with their other destructive energetic effects), and if the US was able to make a single high-yield weapon equivalent to 25,000,000 tons of TNT (in the past, this is true), then the military could easily end up making tens of thousands of "low-yield nuclear weapons" that still if unleashed in large numbers on specific targets could mimic explosions on an order of magnitude of 100,000 (maybe hundreds of thousands) tons of TNT. And keep in mind, this is just assuming that we're using 25,000,000 as the benchmark. It's not like the US didn't make tens of millions of tons of TNT-equivalents' worth more overall. In fact it might even be many tens or hundreds of millions (I don't remember the numbers I saw cited when I did the research but it was in those kinds of ranges). So for all I know, the US military could place an order for, IDK, 200,000 to 300,000 "low-yield" nuclear weapons on the 1,000-tons-of-TNT scale, which would be equal to 200,000,000/300,000,000 tons of TNT-equivalence. So if you fired 10,000 of these at a city, which would leave you with a great majority of these weapons regardless, you could simulate the detonation of a single 100,000 tons TNT-equivalent explosive, which would be like five or six times greater than the explosion set off in Hiroshima.

    And the thing of it is... well... If the US put in an order for 379,000,000 grenades, in one year, during the Vietnam War---not normal grenades but incendiary ones--alongside all else it was manufacturing in terms of weaponry then... I feel like it would be easy for them to make at least something like 800,000 to 1,000,000 of these things (hell, do you really think 2,000,000 to 3,000,000, for that matter, would be totally unattainable?). Equip them to the Trident submarines somehow (I feel this wouldn't be incredibly impossible of an engineering problem to solve) and voila, "the most versatile nuclear arsenal/system on Earth," perhaps (I don't mean to say that someone has vouched for that phrase's usage yet, but that it sounds like a description the government would use to congratulate itself about what it had done).

    1. Ripheus23

      Ripheus23

      P.S.: And that's all assuming that the use of these things doesn't trigger a conventional nuclear exchange. (Ironically, the least of the problems originally faced by the Avengers in the movies [the weaponization idea from S.H.I.E.L.D. for the tesseract] seems to be the greatest of the problems in the real world [weaponizing the most powerful energy source in this general way...].)

    2. Ripheus23

      Ripheus23

      EDIT: 10,000 of the 1KT would = 10,000,000, not 100,000. IDK why I wrote the number I did in the above.

  9. Some ideas: A fantasy story told in the form of a "fake" Wikipedia-like online encyclopedia about an otherwise nonexistent series of fantasy books. A fantasy story told in the same form but as if it were the Wikipedia of an alternate world. A two-level fantasy story told in the Wikipedia-like format, with the caveat that the otherwise nonexistent books have articles about them with citations that refer to "outside" events in a higher-level fantasy setting (e.g. in an article about Book 5 in the series, say, there would be a footnote that would refer to the inspiration for a scene in the fictional Book 5, and the inspirational event would itself be part of another layer of fantasy storytelling). OTOH this seems "obvious" enough of an idea to have already been pursued...
  10. IIRC, Augustine's description of sin in itself was not turning towards X = evil, but the turning away from the good itself (so sort of like "the absence of good," though as per the story this is related to (in my writing project set), the doctrine of evil-as-the-absence-of-good is the intellectual mistake that causes the apocalypse...). It's in the turn... You could, I suppose, even refer to this as the Augustine-Kant thesis (since Kant's doctrine of radical corruption is equivalent). Now, in the story I'm working on in which all this is relevant, the turning-concept of evil is used to "explain" the existence of subjective time. The argument goes something like: Goodness in itself is mapped by a triangular diagram. This diagram is automatically embedded in physical space. Everything in space is subject to motion. The simplest motion of the triangle would be rotation. The rotation of the triangle of evil, or the anti-triangle, is counter to the rotation of the triangle of good. If there were no subjective difference between the rotations, each would trace an indistinguishable circle overlapping the other. Therefore, to differentiate between the rotation of the triangles of good and evil, you need subjective time.
  11. Now that's a really intriguing idea.
  12. I was reading on Quora (IIRC) a post where someone asked about a Form of Evil in Platonism, like the Form of the Good. Like, why does Plato not speak of an FOE? The trend in the answers seemed to be that evil is nothingness/absolute chaos, which is formless, so a Form of Evil would be like a Form of Formlessness, which seemed contradictory. However, I think you could easily fit a Form of Evil into Platonism. First, you might just say that the Form of Good, via the Form of Difference (which Socrates does speak of in a dialogue, IIRC), is really the Form of the Difference Between Good and Evil. Also, since the Forms of the virtues are said to exemplify those virtues (e.g. the Form of Honesty is honest), which means they're kind of like personal agents themselves, you could just say that there were Forms that personally used their free will to do evil, and these would be Forms of Evil.
  13. Sort of kind of not really maybe? Imagine the logical shenanigans involved in making that postulate work out...
  14. It could also be that in the distant future, ANY travel, almost anywhere in the Cognitive Realm, might be superdangerous, comparatively. Kinda like how they didn't always use the Ways in WOT due to Machin Shin (or the dream-realm, or w/e).
  15. I just learned the word "Centuriators" and I can't wait to come up with a way to apply it :P

    1. Show previous comments  1 more
    2. Ripheus23

      Ripheus23

      I learned it in reference to a text called the Magdeburg Centuries, which was some Protestant analysis thing. Apparently it refers to "historians who organize information using 100-year time periods as the common interval" or something.

    3. Aon GanchoLibre
    4. Ripheus23

      Ripheus23

      As far as the factions in the Ripheus story go, I would guess that a group of centuriators would be ecometers ("outside" specialists, so to speak) but IDK, I don't want to just say "the ecometric centuriators"...