Lightning

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About Lightning

  • Birthday 09/03/1977

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    Utah
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    Math

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  1. Well said.
  2. There seem to be three possibilities. 1. Taravangian could only read Hoid's memories. This would have been what I thought was the only possibility because how could messing with someone's memories not be considered harming them? Moreover, it would be quite strange if Hoid's short-term memories were instantly stored in breath. Taravangian suggests that he needed to store memories for the reason that he had lived so long. So short-term memories wouldn't need such storage. Then again, it might be an automatic function of relying on breaths. Still, Hoid doesn't have enough breaths to have reached agelessness with them, only perfect pitch. And yet, Hoid's short-term memory is clearly altered. It is possible, as some have speculated, that Hoid (partially) did this to himself (through feruchemy, and the missing coin). But wouldn't that raise Taravangian's suspicion, if Taravangian didn't also manipulate those short-term memories? 2. Taravangian could only alter or remove memories, but not read them. But then how would he know which memories to take? The fact that Hoid's perfect pitch is off suggests that, at the very least, some (but not all) of the breaths are gone/destroyed. I suppose it is possible that only some of the breaths had memories, but that sounds implausible to me. 3.Taravangian could do both: read the memories and alter/destroy them. In this case, why didn't Taravangian turn Hoid into his own instrument? Or destroy all the memories? It just doesn't make sense to me that Taravangian could mess with Hoid's memories without doing harm. As other people have noted, the very idea of someone messing with our memories is one of the most terrifying thoughts imaginable. It goes to the very heart of what makes us...well...us. And clearly Hoid was terrified. Bonus question: Why would Hoid expose this most vital part of himself to the most dangerous being in the universe? We, as readers, already went through this when Sazed found he couldn't trust his own metalminds. It was extremely scary. Is Hoid really dumb enough to expose that most essential aspect of himself to manipulation?
  3. ...a drug addict. Odium taking away his pain is his drug. It numbs his feeling. Without that drug, Moash actually might start changing for the better. This really helped me have more compassion for Moash. He is like Teft, but still in the grips of his addiction. Thoughts?
  4. Just finished. Like someone else said, how Taravangian treats Hoid left a very bad taste in my mouth. It was like a gut punch at the end of a beautiful play. I was often moved to tears throughout the book, but that last scence was...just...depressing.
  5. So a lot of the theories I've been reading liken Renarin's illumination of Moash to allomantic gold or malatium. I have a different theory Renarin went in search of Kaladin, wanting to help him. Is it possible that Renarin did exactly what he was trying to do---help Kaladin. The truth was that what Kaladin truly needed at that moment was hope. Hope that his dear friend Moash could be a better person. That he was not beyond redemption. What they saw was indeed a possible version of Moash, perhaps if he has made different choices in the past. But could the trigger have been Kaladin himself?
  6. I actually really liked it! It left much more of a cliffhanger than most of Brandon's works, which was unnecessary for me since I'll buy the next edition, but I understand it for the medium. I was surprised by my reaction to one scene. My favorite part was:
  7. I was wondering how there could be land mines in a world without guns...
  8. I believe you do the following: 1. Draw any acute triangle. 2. Draw the altitudes. (These are the line segments from an interior angle of the triangle to the opposite side, that are perpendicular to the opposite side.) 3. The three points where the altitudes hit the opposite sides are called the "foots of the altitudes". These give three points. 4. The midpoint of each side of the triangle gives another three points. 5. The three altitudes intersect in a single point, called the orthocenter. 6. The points halfway from each vertex to the orthocenter give another three points. 7. It is an old theorem that the nine points above all lie on a unique circle, the nine-point circle. See: nine-point circle link Every acute triangle has such a 9-point circle. Going from a circle to its 9 points, you need to have in mind a triangle somewhere. There are many different choices for the 9 points. But not every choice of 9 points will work.
  9. Yes, give it a cost. The cost might be that it won't work again for 3 hours. Or they have a bit of bad luck afterward. Or...
  10. My theory is that Harmony is eventually going to become:
  11. It just struck me. As Brandon told us, Doomslug eats mushrooms. The prevailing theory is that Doomslug is a key component to the hyperdrive. Couldn't it be that the ship requests mushrooms due to a subconscious effort to have food available so the Doomslug will stay onboard?
  12. Random conjecture:
  13. Yeah, that was my interpretation (at least how I read it in the book).
  14. I really like this!
  15. I'm surprised that there hasn't been a thread pointing out the faces in the White Sands 2 graphic novel. Of course, it took me many months before I finally broke down and bought it. If you've found any faces, point them out here.