Veil

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About Veil

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    Cryptozoologist
  • Birthday October 18

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    Roshar
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    reading, writing, science, general geekery

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  1. No, it was something Nohadon said in Dalinar's vision. The first thing Navani translated from the Dawnchant. Part of the old song/chant things whose meanings had been lost. (WoK chapter 60). I mean, really, I shouldn't be surprised that Hoid knows the Dawnchant (at least well enough to have translated a sentence) but still. Wonder if he's ever stayed on Roshar during a Desolation, or if he just swings by in between.
  2. Nale is, I believe, the name Nin/Nalan is known by in Shinovar. I presume "Bent Nale" is a pun off "bent nail."
  3. Back with more! Including Aon Reo! (Not the crazy one yet, but you can see the slightly-less-crazy version on Tumblr.) Mai: Mea: Nae: Omi: Opa: Rao: Reo: (Double sized because it's so insane.) Rii: Only seven more to go!
  4. I've been working on modifying the Aons lately, so I thought I'd drop by and offer this picture: Elantris and the surrounding cities form the Aon Rao, but rotated 90 degrees. The chasm line connects the corner of Elantris' wall with Kae's wall at or near the road. In the book it's explicitly stated that the line ends at Kae's boundary wall, so the only alteration the book would need to make it clear is an accurate map and a passing reference to Raoden starting his line at the base of Elantris's wall. Or possibly a few feet away; could be the chasm line doesn't actually touch the mountain line like it does in my drawing.
  5. I think this is a safe bet. It's unclear how long Szeth had been an assassin before he killed Gavilar, but he was never notorious. People didn't know to prepare for him. Gavilar was probably about the biggest challenge he'd faced up to that point--Plate, Blade, lots of guards... After that point was when the Assassin in White became infamous, so the assassinations Taravangian sent him on became increasingly difficult as more and more people--with and without Shard or half-shards--were pitted against him. He was proficient at Surgebinding by the time he killed Gavilar, and he's had several years' more practice since then.
  6. I agree with Aleksiel and everyone else. Kaladin's biggest problem right now is that he's trying to do too much and it's eating away at him. Also, since all indicators point to Windrunners being a fairly inclusive order (with their squires and all)--as opposed to, say, Bondsmiths, whose numbers are severely limited--I agree that his next ideal is going to have to do with leadership or giving up responsibility. Currently my leading theory is something along the lines of "I will teach others to protect those I cannot" or "I will give men the means to protect themselves."
  7. I'm sorry, but all I was thinking at this point was: Which the more I think about it, the more that actually does sound like kandra. Replace "oaths" with "contracts" and... XD Yep. No more late-night speculating for me. (Though I do think it would be awesome if it turned out the Diagram was way more Cosmere-aware than non-uber-genious Taravangian could ever suspect. The comment about the Wanderer seems to fit with that possibility...)
  8. First of all, yes. That's exactly how the feud started. Second of all, that's obviously possible. And considering all the Cosmere languages are by default translations already, there's no real way to be sure whether what's happening here is a word surviving or a root persisting. If axehounds are "tacos" or "tachos," so to speak. I'm inclined to believe that if Brandon wanted us to see a persisting root instead of an intact word he would have called them "axecani" or something. And that's kind of why. It's not an axecani where Hoid says "I get axe, but cani? Like canine?" The scene still would've worked without the word "hound" being a recognizable morpheme in the Alethi language. Or without Hoid pointing out that Rosharans have no right to be using that word. But I also have a habit of reading too much into things (I will freely admit that Mistborn ruined me that way.) I wonder what axehounds are called in other Rosharan languages?
  9. So Hoid's basically like us, grasping at tenuous connections and blowing them out of proportion?
  10. This is possible, I suppose, but I'm not 100% convinced. I mean, the Dawnchant is a dead language. Not Latin-dead because no one speaks it natively anymore. Dead because no one remembers what any of the words mean. It isn't until Dalinar starts speaking it and can provide translations that they make any progress. (And the Dawnchant probably wasn't even the language of the original Rosharan humans, if it was spoken when the Radiants had already been founded.) So why would axehound have remained intact through thousands of years, multiple Desolations, and the fall of countless nations for Hoid to comment on when everything else was lost? A derivative, maybe, the way some English words have Latin roots, but hound is apparently just "hound." It doesn't come from a word that means "dog." It is a word that means "dog." A word that means "dog" in a language that has no use for a word like that. It would be like someone from Herdaz wearing Bermuda shorts. Also, I'd be curious to know more of the history of axehounds. I've always imagined (due to their similarity, culturally, to dogs) that they were more or less bred by humans from a different, wild species. Like how you can have wolves without humans, but not dogs--you can have, I don't know, "axeshells" without humans, but not "axehounds."
  11. So I was thinking about Feather's WoR Splintercast the other day. Specifically about her musings on chapter 45 and this observation from Hoid: As Feather pointed out, it's strange to think that there's a word/morpheme in Veden and/or Alethi that Hoid knows the meaning of but the people of Roshar don't. What I'm wondering is if the Rosharan hound is a loanword from another Cosmere language. Plenty of other people have pointed out that shash is both a letter on Nalthis and a glyph on Roshar. We have a WoB that says there are "interesting connections" between languages/cultures, at least in part because all the Shards have a common origin. But what if it's more than that? What if an early worldhopper (Nalthian or otherwise) saw axehounds, then known by another name, and was the first one to call them hounds (in his/her native tongue.) The name stuck on Roshar, so now they have a word whose original definition they don't actually know. Thoughts?
  12. I did a summary of the whole thread a few pages back. (Here.) We don't necessarily need the ongoing or discarded theories anymore, but I also gathered up the observations people might find interesting.
  13. Clearly it was Honor trying to be faithful to Cultivation's "artistic interpretation" of Odium's trolling.
  14. Part Three! I and K Aons. (Took longer than I wanted because of Aon Iad. Domi, but I hate Iad. Five tries to get the Aons at the right angles because it's juuuuust a tad over 90 degrees between each pair.) Anyway. Blah blah Tumblr for extras blah. This set includes the two Aons with two prime candidates (Ire and Kii) so both potential new Aons are included. Iad: Ial: Ido: Ien: Ire: Kae: Kai: Kii:
  15. Yeessssssssss. Okay, now let's get a math major in here to tell us what this actually means. (I tried reading explanations of Julia sets on a couple math forums, but the chaos/order thing was literally all I got out of the jargon. Oops.) Also, that Wikipedia animation is apparently a Julia set in four dimensions (and not the time-is-the-fourth-dimension 4D I'm at least kinda sorta acquainted with.) So.... no idea if that's significant or not. (Shadesmar is the 4th dimension?)