industrialistDragon

Dragon's Discussion Links

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Because I read a lot of author blogs and thinkpieces and I'm sure @kais gets tired of my constantly spamming PMs sometimes. 

So, to start off, the thing I keep chewing on at the moment is the idea of "seeing the author in their characters." It was brought up in these posts by Jane Lindskold (whose Firekeeper series is amazing and whom others might know from being Roger Zelazny's partner, coauthor, and biographer shortly before he died). 

https://janelindskold.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/tt-is-that-the-author/

https://janelindskold.wordpress.com/2017/06/08/tt-a-question-of-identity/

https://janelindskold.wordpress.com/2017/06/15/tt-is-he-in-there/

 

I think Lindskold brings up a very good point, in that no matter how much people want to say "this character and the author share X traits and history therefore they are the same!" it is still taking certain specific aspects of a person and running them through a fictive lens -- by definition fictional characters are too limited to really "be" the author. 

What do you all think? Is it possible to see what the author is like by looking at the characters they write? Does it matter? Do you care? When does "writing what you know" become a distraction to the readers (who always seem to want to go "aha! gotcha, that's real!" with a character or event).

 

(*NOTE: I'm still compiling links for a Mary Sue post, so this IS NOT ABOUT MARY SUES AT ALL. The blog posts touch on self-insertion (by way of cameos), of which Sues are a subtype, but the issues around Mary Sues are different. This is talking about readers sussing out the author from their characters, not the author consciously hiding themselves in their work)

 

Edited by industrialistDragon
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I honestly don't know how writers write characters without at least a little bit of themselves in them. Some experience, some emotion, so faucet of self, to me, is in every character I write (that has dialogue and character development). I can write outside my experience, but I have to be able to connect to that experience, or I just can't connect with the character.

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I think this more comes up with authors who have an established body of work, where readers then go back into the canon and try to figure out the author's private life from what they've written.  Specifically, they were talking about readers who look at a body of work and say "this character is actually the author."  Lindskold was saying that it's impossible to find the real person inside what you're describing (the use of one's own experiences to lend realism to their characters) because of all the filtering the real experiences go through to be able to fit into fiction. The other opinion was that, in certain cases, the author is so blatant in the use of incidences from their lives that it's impossible NOT to make assumptions from the texts.

Personally, I like being able to see some firsthand experiences in the stories I read. I enjoyed the medial portions of the Stardoc series by SL Viehl (other major issues with her work aside) because to me they were clearly based on her experiences working in a trauma center, and I find that insider perspective really compelling. Julie Czerneda was a biologist before she started writing scifi and it really shows in her awesome aliens, especially in her Species Imperative series. This kind of "seeing the author show through the work" can really backfire, though, and I'll find myself getting distracted from the story, or even stop reading all together if it's too blatant or not worked into the text well enough. 

I also agree with Lindskold in that I think it's impossible to really know an author just through what they've written, precisely because an author only puts portions of themselves into a work. A real person is always going to be more multifaceted than a fictional character, no matter how many points of connection the two have. Assuming you "know how an author really is" just from the stories they've written is like assuming you know what someone is really like based only on what they post to Facebook. It's a curated experience. You can see some things, but it's never going to be the same as getting to know them in person. 

 

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I get that. I feel the same way about the rock climbing in Wolfwalker. That sort of glimpse into an author's life is really neat! I'm not sure I've ever been distracted by it. I only remember books fondly for it, like the aforementioned Stardoc series.

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