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What Are You Reading, Part 2

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I just finished Ghostly Echoes by William Ritter, which I've been meaning to read for a long time now. It was absolutely amazing. Maybe if I were a better detective myself, I could've seen the obvious hints towards the big plot twist at the end (which had been hinted since the first book), but I'm not. I also tend not to worry too much about that stuff while I'm reading books. I tend to just read as if I'm the character, figuring out everything along with them.

But I really recommend anyone read the first book, Jackaby, if you like the idea of Sherlock Holmes meets fantasy (fairies, underworld, etc.) and lots and lots of mystery (plus a little bit of tasteful romance). And William Ritter is just marvelous with his writing. So simplistic, yet so amazingly beautiful.

Edited by StrikerEZ
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Currently I'm reading A Study in Charlotte by Brittany Cavallaro. It's an interesting take on a modern day Sherlock and Watson duo. It's about Sherlock's great-great-great granddaughter and Watson's great-great-great grandson solving a murder at their boarding school. So far, it's enjoyable!

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On 3/15/2017 at 10:06 PM, StrikerEZ said:

I just finished Ghostly Echoes by William Ritt, which I've been meaning to read for a long time now. It was absolutely amazing. Maybe if I were a better detective myself, I could've seen the obvious hints towards the big plot twist at the end (which had been hinted since the first book), but I'm not. I also tend not to worry too much about that stuff while I'm reading books. I tend to just read as if I'm the character, figuring out everything along with them.

But I really recommend anyone read the first book, Jackaby, if you like the idea of Sherlock Holmes meets fantasy (fairies, underworld, etc.) and lots and lots of mystery (plus a little bit of tasteful romance). And William Ritter is just marvelous with his writing. So simplistic, yet so amazingly beautiful.

I looooove this series! I've saved so many funny quotes from it.

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I finished Hearing Secret Harmonies, bringing my reading of A Dance to the Music of Time by Anthony Powell to a close. This must be what Harold Bloom meant when he referred to the "sublime." It's been a few years since I've been left dazed by the conclusion of a series. (The last being The Prince of Nothing series for non-sublime reasons, and then the Aegypt cycle by John Crowley before that).

Now to read The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu for Book Club next week.

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I recently read Half Upon a Time, and it is perhaps the most amusing thing I've ever read. The main character lives in a village where everyone is training to become heroes to rescue princesses, but the MC is totally disillusioned with the likelihood and reasonability of it ever happening. Of course, a damsel in distress does appear, and he is the only one smart enough to help her. The first 20 pages or so made my sides ache with how much the MC mocked the tropes of fairytales.

The third book floored me. It referenced Norse mythology so seamlessly in a book that was a Snow White remake that it took me a minute to fully realize what happened. It was an obvious reference to me, but I can see it would be impossible to catch if you don't know what was going on. It wasn't necessary to understand the plot, but it was a really interesting touch, and made this series one of my new favorites.

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Just finished the lost stars series, very good read although I was disappointed in how Jack Campbell suddenly forgot how light works at several points in the story, normally this wouldn't be an issue but in a series that's so well known for it's realistic depiction of physics this just struck me as annoying.

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@Djarskublar I too found that trilogy very lolworthy. Since you enjoyed it so much, I recommend checking out James Riley's other series, Story Thieves. It also makes a lot of fun of storytelling tropes and breaks the fourth wall in an almost Alcatraz-esque style at times.

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Read the first two books in the Expeditionary Force series by Craig Alanson. If you like Military Sci-fi and humor these are great books.

Starting a re-read of The Powder Mage books in preparation for his new book.

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50 minutes ago, Sunbird said:

@Djarskublar I too found that trilogy very lolworthy. Since you enjoyed it so much, I recommend checking out James Riley's other series, Story Thieves. It also makes a lot of fun of storytelling tropes and breaks the fourth wall in an almost Alcatraz-esque style at times.

Did you catch the Norse reference?

Spoiler

You, know... Odin and his eight-legged horse as the other interdimentional traveler?

 

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@Djarskublar probably. It's been a while since I read Half Upon a Time so I don't remember for certain, but I don't think I would've missed that particular reference.

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Wow forgot how much I like the Powder Mage books. Half way through Promise of Blood and picking up on so much more. This reminds me how much differently I enjoy a book the second go round. When I'm not busy wondering what will happen next I stop to smell the roses so to speak. 

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1 hour ago, StormingTexan said:

Wow forgot how much I like the Powder Mage books. Half way through Promise of Blood and picking up on so much more. This reminds me how much differently I enjoy a book the second go round. When I'm not busy wondering what will happen next I stop to smell the roses so to speak. 

I remember liking this bk when it was new but I never bought the others. I d have to re read it now if I get them.

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8 hours ago, Briar King said:

I remember liking this bk when it was new but I never bought the others. I d have to re read it now if I get them.

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The second and third book are even better.

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I enjoyed book 1 more than 2, but I know I'm in the minority.  I just thought that McClellan did an excellent job setting up book 1, giving you an interesting world with nuanced characters a little bit at a time, and making you want to learn more.  Come book 2, there wasn't all that much worldbuilding left to give.  Some people would see this as a plus, but I like table setting.

Haven't read 3 yet but I'm looking forward to it.  Good characters.

Edited by Who Sharded?
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Lately I've been reading Steven Brust's books chronicling the adventures of the assassin Vlad Taltos. Absolutely 110% recommended. (So far. I'm only four books in; it could take a dive at any time)

Edited by Slowswift
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Finished Safehold 7 last night. Really enjoyed this one a lot! Started 8 right after I read last page of 7.

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